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Best way to clean a CPAP machine?

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CPAPUser +0 points · over 2 years ago Original Poster

What is the best way to clean a CPAP machine? I have been removing my hose and cleaning it in the shower a couple of times a week, with Safeguard soap and hot water. I wash the nose pillows with Safeguard as well. Is there a better system, or a better product than an antibacterial soap? Is there a way to get into the machine itself to clean the parts inside? I ask because once I used the leftover water in my glass to fill the reservoir instead of distilled water. Bad idea. A few days later I found moldy stuff floating in the reservoir and I ended up with a sinus infection which required antibiotics. So, I would really like to make sure my machine is clean!

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wiredgeorge +0 points · over 2 years ago Sleep Enthusiast

Clean the reservoir good and use distilled water. I have NEVER cleaned a hose or the inside of the machine. I will was the mask harness once in awhile to get the oil/dirt off it and clean the mask cushion daily with mild clear hand soap.

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JoeZephyr +0 points · over 2 years ago

Has anyone used the SoClean or Lumin automatic cleaners? And does anyone know what effect they may have on the warranty? I'm using a ResMed Airsense 10 device

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Jen12201 +0 points · over 2 years ago

I would recommend using soclean. My patients say it works fantastic. I'm a sleep technologist (RPSGT). You just put your mask in with the hose attached and turn it on and it cleans the humidifier (if you use one), mask and hose. You should definitely be cleaning the hose. Moisture buildup in the hose is a breeding ground for bacteria and other pathogens. As for the machine itself you dont really need to clean it. You can wipe dust off the outside if you want but other than that there is no need to clean it. It can really do more harm than good if any of the inner workings of the machine got wet. Other than the automatic cleaners like soclean the best method is just plain soap and water, rinse well and leave out to dry. Distilled water only for filling the humidifier. You are breathing that water in through humidity so it is asking to get sick with anything but distilled.

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Unixbill +0 points · over 2 years ago

I have used SoClean 2 about 1 1/2 years. Just doing the cleaning and using a 7-stage water filter that makes alkaline water. In the past few months, I have had two bad sinus infections. Of the many things I am starting to do is replace the air filters and nares weekly. I am still using the filtered water. It seems that distilled water may help solving my recurrent sinus - not recurrent until this April. The humidifier does not have the scaley water as if tap water, but there is an 8th of an inch (about) in the morning. I will start pouring that out too. Thanks.

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VikkiLM2008 +0 points · over 2 years ago

Automatic cleaners are an unnecessary expense. Also they may use ozone which is poisonous at certain levels. A dedicated basin with hot water and antibacterial soap like Dawn dish soap once a week is best. Takes 10 minutes. Submerge hose, mask and headgear for several minutes. Rinse mask and headgear and let air dry on paper towels on the counter. Put the hose up to the faucet and let cold water run through, then hang to dry over your shower head. The filter and chamber can be cleaned in the basin as well and air dried. Don’t twist the filter to ring it out. You can press out some water. Never use bleach or vinegar. If you have a cold do an extra cleaning 24 hours after your fever breaks or about 48 hours into the cold once you are no longer contagious. This prevents you from reinfecting yourself.

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