Forum · BIPAP was the right move!

Write a Reply
92 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-] barbz +0 points · over 2 years ago

True, my centrals were not as many as some, but also...my sleep study was a split one. It seems that they occur mainly in the beginning of my sleep.

I have had my BIPAP only a few days and almost afraid to mention the positive results...I do not want to jinx myself! So far, I am very aware of my breath hesitating...whether it is a full central or not...and the BIPAP kicking in. This has been the hardest part to get used to. Otherwise, I find myself adapting to the BIPAP fairly easily.

DREAMS: I can say that I am truly experiencing dreams for the first time in years. Yes, the say we all dream, we just do not remember them! Nope!!! These are real dreams, with a storyline...an actual plot! It is amazing. It has happened all three nights so far. No complaints...that may come later if a nightmare sticks its head into my head! 😝

What is sad, is that I had to ask for this unit ...also, my DME felt my sleep study did not warrant a BIPAP. I had to borrow fron Peter to pay Paul to do it. Down the road, a nurse practitioner will be visiting from Humana. I will show her my data (both Sleepyhead and SmartLink) and see if she can help with that. I will have actual proof.

Any survival hints, things to be aware of are most welcome. I have to use a FFM and mine is the Hans Rudolph. I have a FP 431 as backup. My sinuses have had the only complaints so far, but will try various tricks regarding this. They are such sensitive individuals 😜😳😔 !!!

69 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-] TheresaS +0 points · over 2 years ago

Dear barbz, Just so happy for your success! Congratulations on this and remembering your dream s! It would be interesting to keep a dream journal during this time. Might I suggest you keep a notepad right at the bedside, and make entries as soon as you awaken -- even just a word or two that will prompt your memory so you can finish it in a little while? I have some good books on dreaming if you would like the titles. Feel free to email me at (spelling this out in case there are bots) tshumard AT sleepapnea DOT org.

Good luck to you!

Be well....Sleep well, Theresa

92 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-] barbz +0 points · over 2 years ago

Theresa, I spoke too soon...last night was a disaster! Think it was the coffee at 2pm. I have to stop caffeine at noon! I have your email and will keep the books about dreams in mind, thanks. Right now I just want to enjoy them.

1 post
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-] ConsiderateVioletNewt0532 +0 points · over 2 years ago

I'm also a bipap fan. My numbers got lots better after switching. I've used the Hans Rudolph 7600 for several years. I've found their new Quest face mask to be lots more quiet. Pleasant dreams.

3 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-] EnthusiasticChocolateMouse8580 +0 points · over 2 years ago

Sixteen years ago after my first sleep study, I was placed on a BiPap. No one explained why; or what central sleep apnea was. Nevertheless, once I adjusted and found a usable mask arrangement, the quality of life improved dramatically. After several years the Bipap failed--I think my insurance had bought a used one--and a follow on study was done to get a new machine. I was put on CPAP. Over the past ten years, my sleep has never been the same. I am repeatedly told that I do not need a BiPap.

Had another study in 214 at my request. Split study in one night, even though I had been diagnosed 16 years earlier, and had copies of the old studies. So, half the night was wasted, and I actually had about three hours of sleep available with the CPAP. Fifteen minutes of quality sleep recorded--9 centrals. Apparently that was not considered significant.

Still, I am told that I don't need a BiPap. I do now have a self adjusting CPAP and my pressures range from 14 to 16 typically, and I have seen as high as 18 when I awaken, versus 11 on the old machine. That helps some. Sorry to say that I do not h ave a lot of confidence in the whole Apnea industry. On the other hand I cannot do without them

92 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-] barbz +0 points · over 2 years ago

Member 116157...wish I knew the answer for you. Not sure if this is ok to say here, but you may be able to get a used one from SecondWind. Not sure if your script has to say BIPAP. I was lucky in that my doctor was open to my trying it. Could not get it through insurance as I mentioned in first post. Paying for it was hard, but worth it!

Wish you luck. We are the ones who are most aware of how our bodies are reacting to our treatment and I wish our input held more weight!

69 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-] TheresaS +0 points · over 2 years ago

Dear Member116157,

What are the differences in the way you feel between the BiPap and the auto-adjusting PAP?

3 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-] EnthusiasticChocolateMouse8580 +0 points · over 2 years ago

Theresa, I am sure I do better with the self adjusting Cpap than with my old one. I had been on a setting of 11/8 for about 10 years. With the self adjusting, I have formed a habit of looking at the pressure just after I awaken, and before shutting down the machine. The pressure usually is in the 14-15 range (in this system, the exhale is a preset reduction, I think 4 below the inhale); but it occasionally jumps to 16, and even as high as 18. So, the machine is working to provide what I need.

I typically rouse up about 45min to an hour after falling asleep. Sometimes this happens over several hours sometimes not. Just like before I was diagnosed. My fitbit says I have 18-20 arousals a night. Have no idea how accurate or significant that is.

Anyway, just venting because no one has ever answered why the original sleep Tech recommended, and the Dr approved, a BIPAP; and why no one else seems to listen when I explain that the BIPAP worked beautifully, and the CPAP never so well.

The other point is that I have had two (or is it three?) follow-up studies over the 16 years. In every case they waste half the night re-diagnosing that I do have Apnea. After that, they wake me and slap a mask on; starting at a very low pressure. Finally, once the apnea is controlled (at least temporarily), they make judgements based on very little sleep time.

Of course there may be other factors in my restlessness that have nothing to do with Apnea. I am fast approaching my 80th birthday; I have aches and pains and have always had leg movement issues which are controlled with mirapex.

Well, enough. Glad to find this forum and I will check it for information. (On one forum I found the answer to my mouth breathing--tape your lips shut. It works.)

69 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-] TheresaS +0 points · over 2 years ago

Dear Member Member116157,

Thanks for your reply. First, congrats on your 80-years-young milestone, and for your using your apnea therapy all this time. I would like to ask you another question before I reply. Did you experience any difficulty in comfort with the original CPAP? Thanks for participating in the forums and best wishes!

3 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-] EnthusiasticChocolateMouse8580 +0 points · over 2 years ago

Theresa, I assume you are asking if I had any problems adjusting to using the machine when I originally started. The answer to that would be yes. I had a bit of claustrophobia at first and it took some time; maybe a week or so to get beyond it. I would wear the mask for awhile, then rip it off and sit on the side of the bed until I could bring myself to put it back on. Ironically, I was a career Naval Aviator and was accustomed to wearing an oxygen mask, so I expected no problems at all. So, you never know what to expect until you are involved. Then it took awhile to find a satisfactory mask. I think the sleep clinic which sent a mask home with me, and the supplier tried to go cheap initially. Don't know why; I had good insurance at the time. Medicare now.

I don't know how many people I have encountered over the years who simply will not use their equipment. I try to convince them of the importance; but, sometimes it is hopeless.

I just went through atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Meds and two stents seem to have gotten me past that. But, I blame it on Apnea because we have been pretty careful about diet and so forth for a long time. Of course, I blame everything on Apnea, including laziness and grouchiness.

Like most users, I have a love-hate relationship with my equipment. I hate to wear it, but I hated the way my life was going before I started using it even more.

101 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-] BrainsNeedSleep +0 points · over 2 years ago Sleep Commentator

116157, I had it explained to me by someone in the biz (i don't know, myself) that DMEs are reimbursed the same amount regardless of which mask, machine, etc, so the profit margins are in supplying the least-expensive equipment. So if you have a good DME, you are more likely to be offered better choices. Also a doc call prescribe one machine over another, I have heard.

The problem IMO is the insurance telling docs and patients what they will and won't pay for, and since it's so expensive to pay for the INSURANCE, not many of us have enough to pay for the Healthcare.

I suggest if all else fails, write a letter to your state and national representatives and ask for help. Ask again until you get some, and send a CC to the American Sleep Apnea Association, the one patient advocate organization for sleep apneics.

The illogic makes you wonder.

Write a Reply
Please be advised that these posts may contain sensitive material or unsolicited medical advice. MyApnea.Org does not endorse the content of these posts. The information provided on this site is not intended nor recommended as a substitute for advice from a health care professional who has evaluated you.