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Nanaat32 +0 points · about 2 months ago Original Poster

So I was recently diagnosed with moderate sleep apnea and severe hypoxemia. I requested the pillows but received the mask. I am very claustrophobic and was unable to use it. They then sent me the pillows which I tried to use yesterday. When I put them on, I felt intense pressure in my ears as well as "gargling" coming out of my mouth. Help! Is this normal? I didn't use them and not sure I will ever get used to this.
I will add after reading through some of these topics, I am very uneducated on the machine as well as sleep apnea in general and am truly a rookie at this.

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Sierra +0 points · about 2 months ago Sleep Patron

I did not adapt well to a CPAP either. It takes some time to get used to it. My suggestion would be to put your machine in a location where you can watch TV or read, and use the machine for a few hours during the day while you get used to it. What is your machine brand and model? Do you know what the pressures are set at?

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Nanaat32 +0 points · about 2 months ago Original Poster

I just received a call from Reliable Respiratory checking in. I didn't realize that with the pillows, you need to keep your mouth shut. That explains the gurgling noise.
I have the ResMed, I think Air 10. Does that sound right? I am in work and unable to look at the machine. I think the pressure is set to be at 16 gradually.
Again, I am rookie so this is all foreign to me.
I appreciate your feedback.

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Sierra +0 points · about 2 months ago Sleep Patron

A commonly prescribed (and very good) machine is the ResMed AirSense 10 AutoSet. A common mask is their AirFit P10. It also is a good mask, but the straps can be a little flimsy. It is true that with a nasal or nasal pillows mask you need to keep your mouth shut. Some find if they keep their tongue at the top of their mouth and right behind their top teeth it can help.

If it is an AutoSet model it will be set up to control a range of pressures and adjust automatically during the night. The minimum pressure is 4 cm, and the maximum is 20 cm. A pressure of 16 is fairly high and can be hard for new users to adjust to.

If you want to learn more about the machine here is a link to a technical manual. There is a lot of good information in the manual, but for a person new to CPAP it can take a while to digest.

I have this machine, so if you have any questions about it, just ask.

But, at this point I think the best tip I can give you is to get used to using the machine while you are awake and preferably distracted by TV or a book.

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Nanaat32 +0 points · about 2 months ago Original Poster

I ended up going back to the full mask. Between the nasal pillows and having to keep my mouth closed, I felt the mask was less claustrophobic. I made it through about 6 hours last night before removing it so I guess I am getting better adjusted. Thank you for taking the time to respond.

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Sherry +0 points · about 2 months ago Sleep Commentator

You might try something called a Tap-Pap. It is a combination dental nasal device. I have got the best results and scores with it.

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