We use cookies and other tools to enhance your experience on our website and to analyze our web traffic.
For more information about these cookies and the data collected, please refer to our Privacy Policy.

Device to Monitor Sleep Apnea without Using CPAP Machine?

35 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
Stoaty +0 points · almost 4 years ago Original Poster

I have mild sleep apnea (AHI - 6.7) which is strongly positional. Left side sleeping - 2, Right side sleeping - 16, Back sleeping - 56. I have thought about getting a pillow to maintain and optimal position and keep me from sleeping on my back to see if that would bring down my AHI into the normal range instead of using CPAP machine. The problem is that I need a way to monitor to see if constraining my sleep position alone improves my apnea. Is there anything available to do this?

2,726 posts
bio
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
Sierra +0 points · almost 4 years ago Sleep Patron

I'm not aware of such a device, other than the machines used for the at home sleep testing, like the Phillips Alice NightOne. The only other thing I can think of is just using a CPAP set at the minimum pressure of 4 cm. But, that is still giving you some treatment. Some people sew a tennis ball in the back of their PJ's to discourage sleeping on their back. Sounds like torture to me though. Another device that is sometime used is a soft cervical collar. Again, may not be the most comfortable thing to wear.

2,726 posts
bio
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
Sierra +0 points · almost 4 years ago Sleep Patron

Another thought may be to use that Android App, Snore Lab, that is discussed in another thread here. The degree of snoring may be some what of a proxy for apnea.

And I don't recall whether or not you have considered a dental appliance. It can be effective in the mild apnea range, and doesn't use pressure so should not cause central apneas. They are expensive though, and short of a sleep study you don't really know how well they are working.

35 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
Stoaty +0 points · almost 4 years ago Original Poster

I read there was some concern about the dental appliance loosening teeth. That was enough to dissuade me from looking in that direction. I suppose I could buy the Alice NightOne for a few thousand dollars, but that seems like killing a gnat with a sledge hammer.

2,726 posts
bio
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
Sierra +0 points · almost 4 years ago Sleep Patron

Yes, and my recollection of using the NightOne is that it was much worse than using a CPAP.

There is a sleep dentist that checks in here now and then. If you made a new thread on the subject I think he would likely comment.

338 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
SleepDent +0 points · almost 4 years ago Sleep Commentator

I am a dentist working in dental sleep medicine. If a patient has normally solid teeth and gets a high quality, properly professionally fitted oral sleep apnea appliance, loosening of the teeth should not be a concern. If a person has active periodontal(gum) disease or has lost a significant amount of bone support due to past periodontal disease, then it could be a concern. You would need a professional consultation with an experienced sleep dentist to find out. Oral sleep apnea appliances are a very good alternative for people with mild sleep apnea, as they tend to be quite effective, with better comfort and portability. Arthur B. Luisi, Jr., D.M.D.

8 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
JudyBJ +0 points · almost 4 years ago

I have some questions: my AHI is usually around 2 per hour, or less. I am wondering if I need to continue to use my CPAP? It has been recommended that I try an overnight oximeter device (without the CPAP), to make sure that the oxygen level in my blood doesn't get too low, while I'm sleeping. Does such a device have a special name (I already have an oximeter that is just for occasional measuring of blood oxygen level)? Where can such a device be "rented"? Where would the data from the device go? Thanks for any advice --Judy B

2,726 posts
bio
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
Sierra +0 points · almost 4 years ago Sleep Patron

Do you know what your 90% or 95% pressure is on average? That will give some indication of the degree of your apnea.

If you plan to import the oximetery results to SleepyHead here is some information on which models are compatible.

944 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
wiredgeorge +0 points · almost 4 years ago Sleep Enthusiast

The device you are looking for is a PULSE OXIMETER. There are a number of types but the ones that just clip to your finger will fall off while you sleep. They are also sensitive to movement and you can use one while awake and sitting on the sofa to practice using the software supplied but any wiggling will mess up results. The best one is the one is strapped to your wrist like a wristwatch and has a rubber gizmo that fits over your finger. They stay put while asleep. The main drawback to these devices is that the instructions are pretty horrible as they were likely written in Chinese then machine translated by google or the like. I was able to figure out how to use mine but it takes a bit of practice. I was concerned about my SPO2 as it dropped right down to about 70 during my sleep study and stayed there for long periods; hence the lack of working brain cells today! Here is the gizmo I bought:

https://www.amazon.com/Contec-Wrist-worn-Oximeter-Software-Download/dp/B00LN4LCMC/ref=sr_1_42_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1539704186&sr=8-42&keywords=pulse+oximeter

35 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
Stoaty +0 points · almost 4 years ago Original Poster

What was your AHI prior to using CPAP?

Please be advised that these posts may contain sensitive material or unsolicited medical advice. MyApnea does not endorse the content of these posts. The information provided on this site is not intended nor recommended as a substitute for advice from a health care professional who has evaluated you.