We've updated our privacy policy.

Does Septoplasty assist in reducing severe sleep apnea

1 post
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
ResourcefulSpringbudMule7211 +0 points · over 2 years ago Original Poster

Hi,

I have severe sleep apnea and my doctor has advised to start with getting septoplasty done as I have a severe DNS rt and a bony spur that is blocking my airway. before going in for the same, wanted some advice on the effectiveness of the procedure.

944 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
wiredgeorge +0 points · over 2 years ago Sleep Enthusiast

A second opinion is a good idea but probably not from non-professionals; see another doctor would be my best advice; if two of them basically agree that the procedure is the right one for your condition, that would be hard to argue.

113 posts
bio
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
snuzyQ +0 points · over 2 years ago Sleep Commentator

You could ask this question of your sleep specialist, M.D. If you are currently mouth-breathing at night to get around the blocked nasal passages, then your sleep specialist will have some idea of how to treat your severe sleep apnea now. That will immediately address your apnea but also allow you some extra time to consider the septoplasty. Rather than to see another surgeon for that second opinion, how about seeking out a pulmonologist? They're schooled enough in anatomy to give you good counsel, plus many of them are educated in sleep disorders. Just a thought.

333 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
SleepDent +0 points · over 2 years ago Sleep Commentator

I am a dentist working in dental sleep medicine. I provide oral sleep apnea appliances, but many of my patients have also had nasal procedures in addition. I would not expect the septoplasty, or a turbinate reduction, or any nasal procedure on that level to eliminate the severe sleep apnea, in and of itself. However, it could be a meaningful step in the right direction. Poor nasal patency does contribute to the causation of sleep apnea. It also makes treatment with both CPAP and oral appliances significantly less effective and can cause them to fail outright in some cases. It is not a minor procedure, like a turbinate reduction, but it is nowhere near as major as a UPPP or jaw surgery. Oftentimes can make some sense for the patient. Arthur B. Luisi, Jr., D.M.D.

4 posts
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
MAC +0 points · over 2 years ago

Hi, I would also be interested in learning about clinical studies and results related to the effectiveness of septoplasty on sleep apnea. I agree with George about seeing a sleep medicine specialist and reviewing options. I also have a severe DNS but am on CPAP. My sleep medicine MD suggested that I see an ENT prior to my sleep study to check if any blockages. The ENT told me I have a severe deviated nasal septum and he couldn't even complete the exam. He recommended surgery, which I have not pursued. A subsequent overnight sleep study showed severe sleep apnea. I started CPAP therapy immediately, without dealing with the DNS. I have been using a Phillips Respironics Dreamstation APAP machine for eight months now. I have been very compliant with using the machine nightly and can recognize that it has contributed to feeling better. For me, the mask has been the most important element affecting successful therapy. I started out with the Nuance Pro mask and pillow cushions. Upside with this mask was that it was minimally obtrusive and I did not feel claustrophic with it on my face. downside was that the pillows would get out of place as I moved and interrupt my sleep. I have since switched to the Wisp mask with nosepiece that covers entire nose. The first few nights I was very conscious of the mask on my face, somewhat claustrophic. I stuck with it and the upside is that it doesn't get out of position as I move. I even slept through an entire night once without fully waking. The mask does leave red marks on my cheeks and nose and I have been trying different ways of using soft tape and foam to address this. There are nights when the DNS affects my sleep, my breathing and the reported sleep results on the machine. But I have had good results with CPAP, feeling better, sleeping better. I don't know that septoplasty would be worthwhile at this point. It would be nice to be able to breathe better through the nose and cut back on the mouthbreathing, which is another issue you may encounter on CPAP. I deal with it by wearing a cervical collar instead of a chin strap and using tape on my mouth (a small piece rolled onto itself, sticky on all surfaces placed between the lips). There is a lot of tweeking and trial and error involved in finding what works for you to be successful and relatively comfortable dealing with sleep apnea. I wish you well as you proceed.

113 posts
bio
Was this reply useful? Learn more...
   
[-]
snuzyQ +0 points · about 2 years ago Sleep Commentator

Hi MAC. CPAP treatment is the most effective and least invasive therapy for sleep apnea and septoplasty doesn't really even come close concerning effectiveness. It sounds like the septoplasty could truly benefit you from other standpoints, even if the benefit were only for comforts' sake (but it seems there are many other potential benefits of this surgery for you). If an ENT were to tell me that I had a severe deviated septum and that he was unable to complete my exam because of it and were to recommend surgery, I would seriously consider having the surgery. But that's me and you're you and you will be the best judge in deciding what you need and what you don't need and when. Take care.

Topic locked due to inactivity. Start a new topic to engage with active community members.
Please be advised that these posts may contain sensitive material or unsolicited medical advice. MyApnea does not endorse the content of these posts. The information provided on this site is not intended nor recommended as a substitute for advice from a health care professional who has evaluated you.