Forum · dsyr New to Group

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[-] dsyr +0 points · over 2 years ago

Hello All: I have severe sleep apnea. I used both C-Pap & Bi-Pap. I never could get used to them, I tried. So I no longer use them.

My Pulmonary Doctor put me on oxygen at night. Said it would help keep my heart strong. Had a heart attack 10 yrs. ago. I now sleep in a recliner chair to keep me somewhat tipped upwards for the apnea. I also snore a lot. My wife can't get past that.

So that's pretty much it with me. Wonder if others are on o2?

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[-] Rohit +0 points · over 2 years ago

Hello OP, how long ago were you diagnosed with sleep apnea? Recent years have seen several advances in technology, with the newer machines being more compact, less noisy, and with algorithms to make breathing on CPAP easier. The masks have also evolved, and several shapes, sizes and types (nasal, full face, hybrid, nasal pillows etc.) are now available. Furthermore, several issues such as anxiety, claustrophobia, nose congestion and bloating can make it difficult to use CPAP, but can be treated to improve comfort and ability to use CPAP.

If it has been some time, you may want to consider meeting your sleep provider again to discuss the above, as well as other potential treatments if you still cannot tolerate PAP therapy.

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[-] dsyr +0 points · over 2 years ago

Thanks for your response. Yes, I've been following the equipment changes over the last couple of years. I also keep up with my Doctor appointments. For now I'll stay on my Meds and oxygen. At least I don't feel bad so that's good. As long as I take it easy I'm OK.

Again, thanks for your follow up!

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[-] ToughPuceDolphin4157 +0 points · over 2 years ago

Hopeful of good things with this forum. However, your questionnaires are not capturing my answers correctly, or stating I did not answer--wrong. Too bad. Poor start. Apparently I am unable to go back to correct data. Too bad. Poor start

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[-] dsyr +0 points · over 2 years ago

Agree, I hope the forum takes off and stays strong. The forums are a big help for some people. I answered your entry as best I could. Sorry if it was lacking. I wish you the best and hope you find what you need.

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[-] MakeSleepAPriority +0 points · over 2 years ago

The forums here are a little different from sites that are not intended for research. The goal is to find common things that help users get the best outcomes treating their apnea. Or maybe also the things that are different between those who succeed and those who fail to get the best outcomes. One question that hasn't been answered well in the literature yet is "what do pepole with sleep apnea see as a good outcome?" "Is it different from what the medical community thinks?"

Member 677, you started this section, what would your ideal outcome be if you three wishes related to treating your apnea? What is most important? Is it related to your overall health, quality of life issues, sleep, daytime function, longevity? How about the others in the forum?

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[-] Suzi +0 points · over 2 years ago

I am also new. Have been on CPAP for three years. How often do they need to be adjusted? I'm not feeling as rested lately and I am not sleeping as much as when I first went on therapy. The machine is too noisy for my wife to stay in the same room.

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[-] MakeSleepAPriority +0 points · over 2 years ago

Welcome! It's interesting about the feeling rested. We should always report that to our sleep professional to check the download and be sure the settings are still correct for you. But, when we start CPAP we have a big sleep debt because of the interruptions in our sleep to wake up and breathe. It normally takes about 20 minutes to fall asleep if we are well rested so it isn't unusual for new CPAP users to feel like they "can't sleep" when they become "normal". Also, in one or two nights we go from sleep deprived to well slept so we really feel the difference ....until it becomes normal. CPAP units are quite quiet now days. Sometimes a "noisy" one may indicate a mask leak. Your sleep professional can check that too. Your wife can help by going with you to an appointment and describing what keeps her awake. Keep up the good work getting used to it. Soon it will become just part of your routine like brussing teeth, getting dressed, wearing glasses/contacts etc. Welcome to the group. Keep us informed on what does and doesn't work for you.

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[-] CourageousMaroonWolf5407 +0 points · over 2 years ago

Member "151677",

I have used PAP machines (CPAP ~18 yrs) and now BiPAP Auto Bi-Flex for the last 3 years and it sounds as though you have a psychological block/hurdle that is keeping you from adapting. I for instance used air-filter respirators in my work without a problem... but when I was asked to wear an air-supplied mask, I freaked out... I just couldn't do it ! This was my psychological hot button I guess. But I have easily adapted to my CPAP and now my BiPAP... and with proper help I think I could have adapted to air-supplied masks e.g. scuba etc ! I suggest you ask your Sleep Medicine MD for help... and IF he/she canNOT provide help, ask if they can recommend a psychologist who has treated Apnea patients who have difficulty adapting to their masks !

My experience with Sleep Pulmonary MD(s) is that too many are NOT yet up-to-speed on treating Apnea patients! It seems your your Pulmonary MD is likely simply treating you with what he/she knows best and maybe has NOT developed skills needed to treat Apnea patients!?? Ask your Pulmonologist what % of his/her patients are Apnea -vs- Ordinary Pulmonary issues. IF they get upset with such question(s), then it's time to consider a change!

Taking oxygen as you are also has risks that you need to consider.

How old are you ? Regards, Sam

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[-] dsyr +0 points · over 2 years ago

Sam, Thanks for the response. You bring up some good points. I am near 62 years old. What "risks" with oxygen other than a fire hazard? Best regards, dsyr Dan

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[-] dsyr +0 points · over 2 years ago

To # 8, Thanks for responding. My equipment is just loud enough to bother me/spouse. And she has in fact attended educational meetings with me some time ago. I'm well past trying all that again. I do take sleep medication from my Doctor. I'm not doing so bad. Thanks again. dsyr Dan

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