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Intermittent readings

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jcc +0 points · 3 months ago Original Poster

Hello new to forum

So I had an interruption last night. Up after 3 hours, used bathroom , fell back asleep without cpap engaged.

Work after an hour or so and put the mask and machine back on.

In the am the first data set for 3 hours period showed 1.5 AHI.

The , when the data caught up to second period , showed total AHI of 6.3.

To me me that implies significant AHI events in the second 1/2 of the usage.

My Dr seemed unable to comprehend my concern. In general my average nightly AHI is below 5, but if I’m spiking all over isn’t that bad?

I just thought this happenstance experiment was useful information. I was dismissed my Dr. because average is good.

Anyone else have a similar experience?

By the way, said hourly data not available. That seems suspect to me.

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Sierra +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Innovater

I would say in general I have more apnea events toward morning, probably because I am sleeping less soundly. Do you know what the ratio is of your obstructive events is compared to central apnea events? Central apnea events tend to be more erratic and are not controlled by a CPAP.

Have you investigated downloading SleepyHead to get a more detailed picture of your sleep data? It requires a PC or Mac, and a SD card reader, as well as a compatible CPAP machine.

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jcc +0 points · 3 months ago Original Poster

Interesting , would fit the timeline as more events toward am waking. OSA is listed as 1.3 and central 2.0.

On the sleep study only 1 central apnea versus 59 obstructive.

I’ll look into the software, thank you!

I was never told central apnea not controlled by cpap.

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Sierra +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Innovater

It is not uncommon for central apnea to increase with CPAP treatment. The issue is that obstructive apnea is well controlled with increased pressure. However the increased pressure can upset the O2 and CO2 balance in the blood, and cause central apnea. So in many apnea sufferers the amount of pressure used is a tradeoff. On a theoretical basis one might reduce pressure if central apnea exceeds obstructive apnea. However the real world is more complex. More often different pressures are tried until the total apnea is a minimum. On an auto machine is sometimes accomplished by reducing the maximum pressure to limit the central apnea events. Or another option is to just switch it to fixed pressure CPAP mode, once the best pressure is found.

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jcc +0 points · 3 months ago Original Poster

Thank you for reply. I don’t think with apnea number is menacing , certainly not compared to pretreatment levels

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Sierra +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Innovater

The standard objective is to be under 5 for AHI. With central apnea as an issue I have a bit of trouble always doing that. My wife on the other had who has almost no central apnea, is usually under 1.0 for AHI.

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