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Personal CPAP data : Will enabling me to see and understand my CPAP 'output' and access my CPAP to change setting Help or Harm?

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MarkHanson +0 points · 27 days ago Original Poster

Our group came across this provocative article about Sleepyhead, a tool that enables the patient to access and change their CPAP settings. https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/xwjd4w/im-possibly-alive-because-it-exists-why-sleep-apnea-patients-rely-on-a-cpap-machine-hacker

I for one am very interested in hearing from the community about the potential and already realized benefits and risks discussed. Let the discussion begin.
Mark Hanson

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SirRobin +0 points · 27 days ago

Very interesting read. The one thing that was weird is the statement of Thomas Penzel, a sleep physiologist. “A patient might modify the pressure if they know what they’re doing. Some of our patients have modified pressure themselves,” he added. “If things go wrong, they may end up dead in their bed. This is their own risk. CPAP is not a toy but a medical treatment.”

I don't see how this can happen. For me this is fear mongering to maintain his income/job security.

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Sierra +0 points · 27 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

I have to agree with you. Machines have maximum and minimum pressure limits. The limits might be uncomfortable but they will not kill you. A much more realist risk is for those who can't get their machine to work properly for them, and end up leaving it in the closet. That is the case for about 60% of those that are prescribed a CPAP. They significantly increase their risk of stroke and heart disease simply because they do not use the treatment. Then there are those that have never been diagnosed and go without treatment too.

And to put it all in context consider the issue of diabetics self administering insulin. I am a diabetic using two kinds of insulin, and I consider the risk far higher than adjusting my CPAP machine. Self dosing is not easy, and mistakes really can be deadly. As a Canadian you probably know that a nurse in a personal care home in Canada murdered 8 residents and attempted to murder 6 more using insulin. In the right dose, insulin is life saving, and in the wrong dose, it is life terminating. I once mixed up my insulins and instead of taking a slow acting insulin at bedtime I instead injected a large dose of rapid insulin. Fortunately I realized my mistake, and spent the next couple of hours testing my BG and eating all the carbs I could get my hands on. We were at a resort in the hot south, and late at night options were limited.

So I would have to suggest the consequence of making a mistake adjusting a CPAP could be some short term discomfort, and some less than optimum apnea frequency. But many endure severe apnea daily without any treatment.

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MarkHanson +0 points · 27 days ago Original Poster

Apparently one could make a change that disabled the very mechanism that one wants to function. A power failure would do the same thing. Neither very likely.

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Sierra +0 points · 27 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

That is a very interesting article, that I had not seen before. It fills in many of the blanks about how the SleepyHead software came to be. Thanks for posting it.

My history with it started nearly 4 years ago when my wife got a CPAP. The sleep tech at the vendor we got the machine from told us about it. I got the feeling they were more interested in us monitoring the data from the machine and doing our own adjustments than having to do it for us. Over the years my ability to use it and appreciation of what it was telling me has significantly improved. Yes there are few bugs in the software, but it basically does the job. It certainly makes monitoring and adjusting a CPAP much easier. I certainly would not buy a CPAP machine that is not supported by SleepyHead. For that reason I suspect that CPAP manufacturers are not really as displeased with the existence of SleepyHead as they might say publicly.

As for the legality of using the software and adjusting your own machine, I would have these comments. At least in Canada, and I suspect the same in the USA, the ownership of medical data has been ruled by the Supreme Court to be with the patient. Medical professionals are obligated to provide the data to the patient on demand. I would suggest that the data collected by a CPAP on a SD card belongs to me by the same court ruling.

When it comes to adjusting your machine, I think it falls in the same category as a car. Can you fix your own car? Of course you can, if you own the car. Now if you are leasing it, or only renting to own, then it starts to become a gray area. It may not be totally ethical, until you own it. I believe that each individual needs to make the decision on whether or not they are confident in what they are doing.

In short I highly recommend that CPAP users use the SleepyHead software. The fluffy stuff like MyAir, really does not cut it, when it comes to optimizing your setup. It is mainly designed to monitor compliance for insurance and DME purposes, not for optimizing the machine setup. What you learn by looking at your results in SleepyHead can be used to make the changes in settings yourself, or in discussing potential improvements with your sleep doctor. What you may find however, is that you are an apnea sufferer may be much more interested in optimizing your machine setup, and are willing to spend more time on it than they are. Often they are paid to do sleep studies, do titration tests, and sell CPAP machines, but get very little or nothing to do follow up monitoring and adjustment. In the end that can provide a lot of incentive for the end user to take responsibility for themselves.

The only caution I would offer is that as always the internet and forums are a good place to get ideas on how to use and interpret SleepyHead. However, one needs to be careful in evaluating the credibility of the advice provided. There is lots of good information, but often as much or more is poor or ill informed. Be careful...

Just my thoughts...

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RebeccaR +0 points · 27 days ago Support Team

Thank you all for sharing the fascinating article and comments. Sierra, I was struck by your statement "I certainly would not buy a CPAP machine that is not supported by SleepyHead. For that reason I suspect that CPAP manufacturers are not really as displeased with the existence of SleepyHead as they might say publicly."

This really goes against the more common attitudes. I'd love to hear more of your thoughts on this, Sierra, and what others think.

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Sierra +0 points · 26 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

I guess my point is that having a machine that can be used with SleepyHead is a much more valuable and desirable machine. I suspect ResMed and Phillips know that and turn a blind eye as it if anything helps their business. They won't publicly say that because they have to protect the sleep study industry to which they sell their proprietary ResScan software exclusively.

The practical issue however is that a machine that supports SleepyHead is only more valuable to a knowledgeable buyer of a CPAP. And, I suspect that is not a large portion of the market. Most people probably get blindsided by an apnea diagnosis and have no idea what they are being prescribed for a machine. It is not like buying a new car where you can easily get information about what is good and what is not so good. Once they hear that "insurance will cover it" they probably stop thinking, and just say OK.

When my wife was diagnosed nearly 4 years ago she was told by the sleep clinic that ResMed were the best machines, but neither of us had any idea whether that was true or not. We had no insurance, so shopped around for one and got it at a much better price. The vendor said they would support her in getting it set up, but that we really could do it ourselves using SleepyHead (but I can't officially tell you that, I recall her saying). She gave us a little help getting started but we just montored with SleepyHead, and there has been no need to go for any follow up testing, or sleep studies. Between using an Auto machine and SleepyHead no professional support has been needed.

When I was diagnosed, I was much more aware of what the score was with the machines and how they are marketed. When I failed my sleep test and got the bad news I was given a Fisher & Paykel SleepStyle machine that was very new on the market to use as a trial. They would only offer the F&P machine and not a Phillips or ResMed. So I did the trial anyway. After some investigation I found that the newest F&P was not supported by SleepyHead (and still is not), so I had no way to telling how I was doing in the trial. So, I swapped machines with my wife for one night. That was very revealing, and it was the first hint I was having issues with central apnea. In fact I was suspicious that there was something wrong with the F&P machine because my daily AHI was 3-4 times higher than my wife's despite that her sleep study diagnosis AHI being more than double mine. She got an extremely low AHI with the F&P for that one night, and I got essentially the same with the ResMed as I got with the F&P. In the end I bought the latest version of the ResMed machine instead of the F&P, because of price and also because I was not having anything to do with a machine that was not supported by SleepyHead. I later learned that the F&P machine does not distinguish between obstructive and central apnea, and increases pressure for both, and does not report the breakdown of central and obstructive, and would have been a really poor choice for me. I just got lucky on that one. I had no idea at the time.

So, long story, but my point is that SleepyHead is very valuable to the informed user, and unfortunately newly diagnosed sleep apnea patients are not well informed. I would quite willingly pay more for a machine that is supported by SleepyHead, and captures detailed data then one that does not. ResMed and Phillips are probably not unhappy with that. They occupy the high end of the market for price.

I think the sad part in all of this for the apnea sufferer is that while the sleep study industry has all the tools to look at sleep data in detail just like SleepyHead, they are not doing it. They are just looking at summary compliance data, and if AHI is usually under 5 and the machine is being used for 4+ hours a night, all is good. They will not initiate anything to improve treatment. And that probably has most to do with them not making any money off that end of the business. They have already done the sleep study, possibly titration study, sold the expensive machine, and now would like the customer to stay away, unless they can get another titration study and a machine sale out of it.

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BrainsNeedSleep +0 points · 19 days ago Sleep Commentator

I agree with Sierra, I would not buy a machine, or accept one from the DME, that did not work with SleepyHead (SH). First off, my sleep doc himself looks at my data in SH. Second, I find myself able to track certain environmental things to the times and events in the breathing wave form. I am not a power user by any means, but the parts I do understand and have learned from conversation and showing-me with my doc, it is hugely helpful. Also, when I am hearing others's stories of care, I suggest SH whenever they seem open to it. Many are not, at least in initial stages when they are simply overwhelmed by exhaustion, diagnostic efforts, and adjustment to the entire treatment.

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CharmingSalmonSeaLion +0 points · 27 days ago

This issue is largely an obsolete red herring. It used to arise regularly on the ASAA and other SA websites, but largely faded with the advent of fully self-adjusting APAP machines. Now that APAPs or better are the norm, and current algorithms are effective and quick acting, fiddling with the limits shouldn’t be necessary, except in very rare instances.

The real problem, as others have opined, is Misdiagnosis, non diagnosis, and non compliance. A lot of insomnia is unrecognized SA. Ditto DM2 and PCOS. That’s where the patient advocacy and effort needs to be spent—Unless we want our children and grandchildren to continue to suffer the hell of life blighting mis and non diagnosis that we have suffered......and yet, almost forty years after the advent of a safe, effective,relatively inexpensive and noninvasive treatment innthe form of PAP, the dial has not moved on diagnosis....WHY? WHY? WHY????

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Sierra +0 points · 27 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

My thoughts on the ability of an APAP to self adjust without help from adjusting the settings is a bit different. Yes, in most case if a patient is sent out the door with the machine set wide open to say 5 min and 20 max, things will probably be OK in some cases. However in most cases real improvements can be made by significantly narrowing the gap between the minimum and maximum pressure. SleepyHead is invaluable in doing that. In fact I would suggest that SleepyHead is more appropriate for use with an APAP than with a CPAP. Unfortunately the current generation of APAP machines are reactive, not predictive. They have to learn what the patient needs night after night. The CPAP after a titration study is much more predictive. It is set to the best fixed pressure for that individual patient. It may seem crude, but it works. No trigger events are required to get to that pressure. And I am coming to the thinking that the final adjustment needed on an APAP is to pick a fixed pressure and set the machine into CPAP mode using that pressure.

There may be AI machines in development that will self customize the adjustments to each patient, but they are not here yet. Until then, there is a need for SleepyHead especially with APAP machines. I think the unfortunate fact is that there are many APAP machines that are doing a very marginal job simply because users accept what they get, and the professionals do as well. Is AHI under 5? Yes? Then you are treated. Next...

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CharmingSalmonSeaLion +1 point · 27 days ago

Re power failures, it very much depends on where you live. In my area in CT, the electrical infrastructure is ancient, fragile and less reliable than in many third world countries. At least once in every two weeks, I used to come home to the clocks blinking at me....now most reset themselves, but I can usually tell the power’s been out.

And if you desat badly, as I do, non use CAN be life threatening. Accordingly, I go to great efforts to assure generator and or battery backups. I also will NOT Sleep without PAP for ANY reason, including an overnight PSG, and my partner has orders to not let me fall asleep without my mask —-and I do the same for him.

Remember what happened to sup. Ct. Justice Scalia? Apparently, while away from home at a meeting, he fell asleep in his hotel without his mask on....tragic, untimely, unnecessary end.

I also know of someone who, against her better judgment, allowed herself to be talked into a PSG without PAP. During the study she went into a fib, and by noon the next day, she had a major stroke.

Now, if only I could get my only sibling, who suffers from DM2 and had a CABG several years ago, to use his &$$# machine......

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Sierra +0 points · 27 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

You asked if viewing your CPAP data would help or harm? I don't think there is any doubt that viewing your data can be helpful if you take the time to understand what it means and make the appropriate changes, or use it to ask your doctor about changes.

But can it harm? Well as a regular user of SleepyHead, I will say that the Welcome message you get each day that you transfer your data from the SD card to the computer can be a little harsh. I guess the author was probably trying to inject some humor, but the message of the day changes based on your results from the night before. If your AHI or mask leakage was bad, you can get told in no uncertain terms that it is bad. It will say something like your results are terrible and you need to make an appointment with your provider immediately. Lets just say it gets your attention. But, I do wonder how long someone who is getting "terrible" readings day after day is going to continue to use the software. So if I was to make a suggestion to the author, one suggestion I would make is to adjust the message of the day to be a little more positive and encouraging.

This said, I would have the opposite comment about the ResMed MyAir application. While I have not bothered to sign up for it, I have seen some of the reporting, and some information on how your results are scored. I would suggest it is the opposite to the SleepyHead Welcome screen summary. It is a report viewed through rose coloured glasses. The biggest factor in the score is how many hours you used it. The focus is on compliance, not results. Kind of a high level fluff report, not really useful for anything.

And the ResMed summary data you see on your machine is a rose coloured glasses view of the world too. In over 6 months I have only seen the red unhappy face for mask leaks once. When I looked at the SleepyHead report for leaks that day, it was really, really, bad. I think you almost need to have the mask on upside down to get the red unhappy face. It is pretty much useless for determining if your leakage is acceptable or not.

So, my thoughts on harm is that SleepyHead could do a bit of harm, if you have thin skin about seeing the real data, and would prefer to be told that you are doing better than you really are. SleepyHead can be a bit too honest for some, and might discourage them more than encourage...

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MarkHanson +0 points · 25 days ago Original Poster

Thank you to those who have participated to date. I have a newer CPAP and it includes the wi-fi function, uploading the data to a ResMed server each day. I subscribe to MyAir so I can see the patient-directed view of the data by logging in later in the day. While the info is not extensive, it is something. But I was the one sleeping so it does not tell me more than I would recall if I had a poor night's sleep. I get good marks from the MyAir tool because I, at the urging of a colleague who is also a CPAP user, use my CPAP while I nap. I strongly recommend that broader use of the CPAP; I 'feel' it improves that part of my sleep.

I wonder how often a sleep professional checks on my status between my annual visits using the log on that ResMed server? My annual is coming up. I plan to ask.

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Sierra +0 points · 25 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

My thoughts on MyAir are not very kind. The reporting system strikes me as being crude, and fundamentally flawed. An example for discussion:

  • 70% of the weighting is based on simply operating hours of the machine in a day. 5 3/4 hours gives you a pretty high rating, but the reality is that we need 7-8 hours a night. I find that misleading, and the weighting of it is way too high.
  • Mask seal has a 10% weighting, and if it is based on the same criteria that generates the happy green face or unhappy red face, it is kind of useless. You can get a green face with really bad mask leakage.
  • The gold standard of apnea treatment effectiveness is the AHI value, Yet it only gets a 10% weighting. And a value of 2.4 which is quite poor for most uncomplicated apnea treatment gets a 90% rating within the 10% weighting. The reality is that AHI targets need to be tailored to the individual user. My wife has uncomplicated apnea and is happy with a 0.5 AHI. I suffer from mixed apnea with lots of central apneas, and I am happy with a 2.5 AHI. Each user needs to set their own standard.
  • 10% for mask on off events seems a little trivial. If you are getting up to use the bathroom once a night, that is kind of normal. If you are pulling your mask off because you can't stand it, that is totally different. Seems to me that this value has more value to a new user that is not settled into CPAP use, but hopefully not necessary in the longer term.

And of course this data is of no use if you want to make any kind of decision about whether or not your treatment could be improved. I guess the only purpose of it is to motivate a user to pick up the phone and call for a doctor appointment. However, I think with the weighting system, things would have to be very bad before that is going to happen. Seems to me that the report is more intended to be a feel good thing.

SleepyHead on the other hand has all kinds of detail that is useful in figuring out what is going wrong if things are not good. Here would be an example of one of my first nights with my AirSense 10 AutoSet using the Auto mode, 10.4 cm minimum, 15 maximum, and full time EPR at 3 . Not very good.

And here is one from last night where I was testing a fixed pressure of 11 cm and EPR on ramp only. Not in the sub 1.0 range like my wife can get, but not bad considering what I am dealing with.

So my thoughts are that if one has basic apnea that is well treated to <1.0 AHI, are not experiencing leaks, and find the process comfortable, then there really is no need for SleepyHead. But for that matter, probably no point of bothering with MyAir either. In that situation I think I would just set the Essentials sleep report setting to Plus to get some extra AHI breakdown detail and accurate mask leakage numbers, and just use what it reports right on your machine. It also allows you to set the interval period for reporting your averages.

Just my thoughts. And on providers monitoring the detailed data, I suspect they do not, and even worse, probably do not have any kind of regular routine to even look at summary data, unless you are on probation for compliance. Then they will look at it to see if they should take your machine away. Call me skeptical!

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Ruby +0 points · 25 days ago Sleep Commentator

I’m just responding first to the issue of adjusting your own machine. Unless you are a doctor I wouldn’t think you would want to do that. What is the reason for changing the setting? How do you know that the change you make is correct? If it isn’t, then you aren’t doing yourself any good which is the purpose of using it to begin with. It’s like having a medication you need. Not taking it or taking less won’t help you get well. Taking twice as much may make you sick for another reason.

As for SleepyHead or any program that you might use, just make sure that the information you use or receive is accurate. I believe that if we had a reliable support system (whether doctor or other professional) we wouldn’t need any of these. The problem in large part is that we are given this “stuff” with minimal information and then sent on our way. No wonder adherence is low. I love support groups and forums as you can learn much. But we are all different so what works for one may not for another. Educate yourself with reliable information before making changes.

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Sierra +0 points · 24 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

Ruby, I understand your thinking on this subject. The reality is that if your PAP machine and mask are doing a good job by giving you a good AHI and not annoying you or your sleeping partner with mask leaks, there probably is no need for SleepyHead or even MyAir.

The unfortunate reality however is that not all of us achieve that, and don't have the doctor support to help us. I have no idea who the "doctor" was that signed my sleep apnea diagnosis report. Don't even know if he/she even lives in our country. If I went back to my GP who I see regularly, I don't even think he would know how to turn on a PAP machine, let alone make an adjustment.

I also think one of the reasons that the non compliance rate of PAP therapy is so low, is because the machines never end up getting adjusted properly. And of course many of them end up in a closet and never used at all. For some a PAP machine is just not the answer to their issues, but for most I suspect that a machine adjustment, or mask change is all that is needed to make a major improvement.

Just my thoughts...

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MarkHanson +0 points · 23 days ago Original Poster

I worked for a time in a study as 'patient support;, meeting with new CPAP users and following up with them by email and phone periodically. While the study did not show 'significant' improvement in compliance from the support, my own impression was that it did help. For one it helped me to better understand the range of issues experienced by new CPAP users. And the meaning of 'compliance'. And the care one must take to protect patient confidentiality. I have heard/read of studies that were far more successful with the 'patient support' model and hope to see more studies undertaken so that 'patient support' becomes a regular part of care.
One way I improved my own use was to become attentive to comments by others and notice that just about every group I am in has some number of folks with sleep issues. That usually includes some number of folks who do, and others who do not,use CPAP.

My machine got adjusted because there were several months when I was sending in SIM cards. My machine now can get adjusted remotely because my newer machine apparently has wi-fi access both ways! The compliance rate is low for a number of reasons.
I wonder how much follow-up is done as I bet it is not reimbursed as billable time. No proof just as suspicion.

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RebeccaR +0 points · 25 days ago Support Team

Ruby, I like your point that the bigger issue is lack of information and education to start with. Somewhat related to this SleepyHead conversation, I heard a report about CPAP, data sharing, and insurance on the radio last night; they were interviewing the author of this article: https://www.propublica.org/article/you-snooze-you-lose-insurers-make-the-old-adage-literally-true

Do the story resonate?

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Sierra +1 point · 24 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

Before I retired I had a gold plated benefit plan which was a shared cost between myself and my employer. I never really thought about it much. Then 5 years after I retired, I got cut off from the employer version of the plan and had to make a decision on a private plan. After some careful analysis of the options, I decided that it made more sense to pay for an insurance plan that was very basic, and covered some of the low probability high cost impact issues, but not the more moderate cost reasonably expected items like a CPAP, hearing aid, dental implants, etc. In retrospect it was a good choice in my case. I don't have an insurance company breathing down my neck, telling what to buy and not to buy. I just make my own decisions and shop around. I even changed dentists because the one I had was taking advantage of the gold plated plan, and was not prepared to lower his fees in line with the basic plan. Like in the article where I live in Canada, the price for a CPAP if you have an insurance plan is $2400. If you buy it from an on line CPAP supply store it is more like $800. In the long run it is better to pay for the item out of your pocket rather than feed the insurance game that is played.

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MarkHanson +0 points · 24 days ago Original Poster

This discussion has encouraged me to ask myself,"What do I want (ideally) related to my Sleep Apnea therapy?" Thinking this over I find that I do not want to rely on my own know-how and technical intervention to be the key to my health. I cherish the collaboration and interaction with the team that supports my health. I live in Boston and I am at most fifteen minutes from any of the doctors, health centers, or hospitals I need. It is not luck - it reflects the value my family places on quality health care. My PCP, sleep doctor, urologist, neurologist, cardiologist and dentist are key. Many have become friends over the years. That said I find myself the most critical link among these great individuals because we do not have a unified medical records management system. So ... Reflecting, on the article, I decided some time back to NOT use tools like Sleep Head but rather to focus my efforts on becoming

  1. A better listener when interacting with my doctors.
  2. A diligent participant in my own care by following the guidance I receive.
  3. A thoughtful patient, communicating early and often when I have a question or concern.
  4. Mindful that how I behave is modeling more powerfully to my kids and grand-kids more than anything I say to them.

Several of my colleagues do not live close to the medical providers and services they require. Not by their choice, I am sure. There are many places where population density or the requirements for specialized care do not match economically. Yes, telemedicine and other emerging technologies mitigate some of the distance and limited resource issues. Often however the question is one of cost rather than quality or effectiveness of care. Sometimes it is the complexity of the condition. We as a people need to move beyond these limitations through however many steps it takes to ensure the best healthcare for everyone.

IMHO the key dynamic is how the general public, the medical community, employers and governments view the importance of cooperation and collaboration between these groups. Awareness, education, a lot of listening, and removing barriers has proven very effective in arenas as diverse as industry and social justice. The voice of the customer and the voice of the 'minority' bring new vitality and perspective to the discussion. Realize that the dependencies among groups and individuals matter. Believing that improving efficiency, effectiveness, and focusing on quality-of-life needs to be the goal for everyone in the community, not just those with the deepest pockets or the loudest voices. Such focus, give patients, persistence, and perseverance, over time, brings unexpected amazing results.

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Sierra +0 points · 24 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

It seems to me that if one decides to not look at the detail available from their PAP therapy devices, one should be aware of other indications that should prompt you to see your doctor. Here is one article I found on that, with a quick google search.

Is My Sleep Apnea Treatment Working? The Seven Deadly Signs

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MarkHanson +0 points · 23 days ago Original Poster

Sierra I tried the link you provided and it caused a browser error. Please see if yo can find a good link to the article.

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Sierra +0 points · 23 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

I tried it with Chrome and Edge and it seems to work for me. It is a commercial site, and they are selling product and services. Not advocating that, but it was a sensible list of reasons to monitor your machine performance. Suspect they put it up to generate business for themselves.

Try this link to see if it works.

Is My Sleep Apnea Treatment Working

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MarkHanson +0 points · 23 days ago Original Poster

Sierra I am interested and I do look at the detail - with my sleep doctor. I pay more attention to my affect after I have slept. I also discuss my sleep with colleagues in the sleep apnea community where anecdotal evidence is it. It would be great to have a strong community of patients advocating for sleep, not just for the dangerous conditions like apnea, but treating sleep like diet --- a fundamental of good health. I participate in part to encourage others to speak up and join in! Thanks for lending your voice. Mark

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Sierra +0 points · 22 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

I came across this article from ResMed on a study done on the benefits of their MyAir application.

Empowering the Sleep Apnea Patient

It is an interesting read, but I would suggest to sum it all up, the report would have been more accurately titled "Motivating the Sleep Apnea Patient". I say that because using the app may give the user some illusion of being empowered, but the app itself does not deliver much on how effective the CPAP treatment is, as the entire focus of the application seems to be on improving compliance by providing positive feedback. In other words as I think I have said before, it is a rose coloured glasses view. I am not trying to trivialize the benefit of using the app, because getting the CPAP used is an obvious first step in the successful treatment of apnea. It does not matter how well the machine is set up, if it just stays in the closet unused.

My thoughts are that MyAir and SleepyHead are two totally different software applications. The purpose of MyAir is to motivate the CPAP user to use the machine. The purpose of SleepyHead is to actually empower the user to get the most out of their machine to normalize the impacts of apnea.

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Sierra +0 points · 18 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

One more thought on this subject. This is based on the ResMed AirSense, AirCurve family of machines data handling method, but other machines may be similar. These machines except for the very basic AirSense 10 CPAP, capture detailed data which is only stored on the SD card. Some vendors pull this SD card so the data is not recorded at all and is permanently lost. Even if the card is installed, the detailed data goes on the card, but unless the user physically takes the card to the sleep clinic, it never gets seen by anyone, if the user does not look at it with SleepyHead. So if your clinic or vendor is not asking you to bring your SD card in at most all they are seeing is the summary/compliance data which is transmitted wirelessly. It is pretty scant and limited to the very basics like AHI, Total Hours Used and Leaks. It is not enough to base any kind of change to the treatment pressures or the PAP mode on. I guess my point is that if they are not asking to see your SD card and are actually looking at the detailed data with ResScan in their office, then you are not getting much of a review of your treatment.

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