Forum · SleepHealth app

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[-] barbz +0 points · over 1 year ago

Anyone download the SleepHealth app? It is a joint effort between ASAA, IBM Watson Health Cloud and Apple's ResearchKit.

It looks like it has a 2 1/2 star rating. It started working nicely. Some tasks seem a bit bothersome, but it has made me more aware of how my day effects my sleep. I am going to keep at it. It is my Health ID app that has stopped importing my steps!

I use Motion-X 24/7 to rate my sleep. Do not keep it by my head, but near my waist. It reads my sleep just fine. It is super for my walks.

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[-] mrueschman +0 points · over 1 year ago

I checked it out upon release but deleted it a day or two later because I don't regularly log my sleep, so it doesn't really apply to me. I have seen Motion-X 24/7 before as well and it is a very sleek app. I imagine SleepHealth is somewhat limited because they are using the underlying Apple ResearchKit technology, which makes things a bit more "utilitarian" looking.

I have yet to come across a highly rated ResearchKit app (e.g. PRIDE Study and GlucoSuccess have 2 star ratings) -- I'm not exactly sure why this is. Maybe because the apps aren't flashy and people download them initially with loftier expectations than what a research study can really offer?

Here's a link to the SleepHealth app for those that are interested: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/sleephealth/id1059830442?mt=8

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[-] barbz +0 points · over 1 year ago

SleepHealth is mainly questions you have to answer via a journal or check list. It does not register anything about your sleep. From what I understand is that this data will be collected and used for research.

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[-] barbz +0 points · over 1 year ago

My main sleep software is SleepyHead. Had a time when I was unable to get a sleep Doctor to accept my insurance so I became very involved with following my sleep. The Motion-x24/7 only has basic sleep info. I use it more for monitoring my exercise.

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[-] SusanR +0 points · over 1 year ago

The American Sleep Medicine Foundation has funded my colleagues at Harvard and Brigham and Women's Hospital to test how useful several of the available sleep apps are, particularly understanding which ones are likely to be used regularly and over time. We will keep you updated on our results. We also are interested in what information our community wants to hear about regarding apps and wearables. We will be posting a survey--and hope you will let us know what you are most interested in!

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[-] BrainsNeedSleep +0 points · over 1 year ago

Given that I read conflicting information about the sensitivity of some of the fitness-tracking devices and whether they are or are not validated, I'd like to see some serious investigation of them. Most people I know, other than the digitally-embedded, try plenty of new apps and eventually use only a few of them. I have a sleep tracker on my iPhone and no longer use it, now that I have learned a few things more about what actually is wrong with my sleep, and that while it says it is validated, the developers flat out refuse to provide proof of that. "Trust me," says the spider to the fly. No, thanks. I'd like to see more evidence.

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[-] MQuante +0 points · over 1 year ago

Sleep monitoring apps become more and more popular and everyday new ones emerge on Google Play or the Apple App Store. Most of them just help you track your sleep, others remind you to go to bed, provide a sleep score or sleep goal, and give concrete tips and guidelines for better sleep. From our work with paper and electronic sleep diaries, we know that often simply tracking your sleep and thus allowing you to see your sleep habits and trends can help you to improve your sleep. There are also apps, which try to use on-board phone sensors (e.g. sound recorder) to detect respiratory events. Despite this evolving landscape of sleep apps, evaluation data are rarely available and for most apps scientific evidence is missing. Given the high prevalence and burden of sleep disorders and the limited access to specialist sleep services for many patients, we think that sleep apps could be a powerful tool that offer both screening and delivery of therapy for sleep problems. We are therefore highly motivated to help develop a clinically validated sleep app with input from patient users and would love to hear more thoughts on this topic.

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[-] barbz +0 points · over 1 year ago

I do not use mine to really 'grade' my sleep. It gives me an idea of my sleep quality. I use sleep software when I want to know more.

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[-] BrainsNeedSleep +0 points · over 1 year ago

Hi -- who are you, @MQuante?

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