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VPAP and or BiPAP

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pettclan +0 points · 5 months ago Original Poster

Just wondering if anyone knows of a machine that has a zero EPAP. (exhale pressure) setting. Thanks!

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Sierra +0 points · 5 months ago Sleep Patron

I believe all CPAP, APAP, and BiPAP machines have a minimum pressure (EPAP or IPAP) of 4 cm.

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pettclan +0 points · 5 months ago Original Poster

I figured. Mine has a 3.0. But my apnea is the type where I breath more and more shallow, then stop breathing which wakes me up. So I get to the point of trying to exhale, then the machine blows air into my lungs which of course wakes me up. Oh well.

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Sierra +0 points · 5 months ago Sleep Patron

If you breath more and more shallow until breathing stops, that is typical for central apnea. This is an example of what it looks like on a SleepyHead or OSCAR graph.

This pattern of breathing can sometimes be caused by a CPAP using more pressure than it needs to use. One possible method of reducing the occurrence of central apnea is to minimize the IPAP pressure used, to the extent that it does not cause obstructive apnea. Another method that can help is to use the fixed pressure CPAP mode instead of the automatic mode. But, again the IPAP pressure has to be kept as low as possible.

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