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CPAP induced hypothermia

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ConservativeAtheist +0 points · about 2 years ago Original Poster

I read a post made by another member that was apparently made around 4yrs ago which is why I joined this forum but I couldn’t figure out how to comment on his post so I’m creating this one.

Recently I’ve noticed that when I use my CPAP at night my temperature drops extremely low & tonight it actually went to (91.1) & as I understand it (95) is the beginning of hypothermia & (92) & below is extremely dangerous.

Now I don’t feel cold & I don’t experience any of the symptoms of being cold such as shivering so I’m wondering if the machine is simply changing the air temp in my mouth the same way drinking something cold would or if it’s actually lowering my body temp to dangerously low levels.

Any information or thoughts on this would be much appreciated.

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Sierra +0 points · about 2 years ago Sleep Patron

I think it is normal for body temperature to drop some at night. It helps you sleep. When we are too hot that usually results in a poor sleep. However, your drop does seem excessive. How are you measuring it? It can be hard to get an accurate reading of body temp.

I really doubt that the CPAP could be causing that much of a drop. That said I use a heated hose on my CPAP with automatic humidity control and a delivered air temperature set point of 27 C (81F). I suppose that may help prevent excessive cooling, but since I have no temperature measurements I don't know.

More or less blanket covers are the usual way to control temperature to maximum comfort. I believe 18 C (65 F) is considered to be an ideal room temperature for sleeping, so blankets are required at that temperature for most.

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ConservativeAtheist +0 points · about 2 years ago Original Poster

Thanks for the response. I’m taking my temperature orally & have wondered if the air from the CPAP mask is simply cooling down my mouth as drinking a cold drink would do. I’m going to contact my doctor on Monday & in the mean time I’m going to purchase either an ear thermometer or temporal scanner to see if those temperature readings match up with the oral thermometer readings.

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sleeptech +0 points · about 2 years ago Sleep Enthusiast

When you say your temperature drops, how are you measuring it? Those temperature thresholds you mentioned for hypothermia are for core temp, not peripheral. It is quite possible for your peripheral temp to be lower than your core temp without causing major problems.

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