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sleeptech

sleeptech
Joined Jun 2017
sleeptech
Joined Jun 2017

With home studies, a big factor is exactly what kind of equipment they used. Some home study sets only have 3 sensors in them, which leads to much less reliable data. Others have almost as much as a full in-lab study, so they are much more reliable.

One individual will experience some variation in their breathing from one night to the next, but all the data strongly suggests that it's pretty minor. Also remember the scientific rule of thumb - if you see a thing then it is there, but if you don't see it doesn't mean that it's not there, it just means you didn't see it. So, if you have a good quality sleep study with proper equipment and they record you having obstructive events, then there is little doubt that you do have OSA because there is an actual recording of it happening. If a study doesn't find anything, then it's always possible there is a problem and it just wasn't detected for some reason.

In my experience, home studies are more likely to over estimate AHI than under estimate it. It is certainly not the case that all of them use time in bed as opposed to total seep time. That is very much dependant on the specific system. Although most of my work is in a lab, I also use a home study setup regularly and it certainly uses total sleep time, as we record 4 channel of EEG to measure sleep stage, so we know when you are sleeping and we know when you're awake (we know if you've been bad or good so be good for goodness sake...).

Perhaps try to get a look at the original data, or have a second study and see how it compares.