Forum · CPAP Pressure Too High?

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[-] Jon +0 points · almost 3 years ago

I am trying to determine whether harm can be done by increasing the pressure coming out of the CPAP. Has their been any research as to side-effects of running the machine at a higher pressure?

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[-] AdventurousChampagneSeaLion4882 +0 points · almost 3 years ago

At pressure of 17 I had a problem with fluid leaking from one of my ears. My ENT, who was also my Sleep Apnea Doctor, had no clue about why my ear was leaking. He sent me to a specialist ENT who was unable to determine the problem. After months of this problem, I had a problem with my APAP, which required me to reboot it. When I rebooted the pressure defaulted to the factory setting. I had no further problem with my ear leaking until several days later, when I realized the setting defaulted. As soon as I changed the setting back to 17 my ear started leaking again. Also had hearing problems that greatly improved at a lower setting. Have since found a new doctor!

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[-] DariaVader +0 points · almost 3 years ago

I believe it can affect eye pressure, but then apparently so can untreated apnea. Perhaps Glaucoma is correlated to high pressure but not the cause.

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[-] Jon +0 points · almost 3 years ago

thank for the good information.

--DariaVadar, I will discuss with my ophthalmologist next time I'm in.

--Member722294, what do you mean fluid leaking from your ear? did you have fluid in the middle ear (usuall w/ otitis media)? Trying to think what could leak. I do know that the waxy stuff can liquefy---from personal experience. (yuck)

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[-] StarSleeper +0 points · almost 3 years ago

http://www.cpaptalk.com/our-collective-cpap-wisdom/checking-CPAP-machine-settings.html

You should really work with your sleep doctor about this but here is what I found. Good luck.

A pressure that is too high for you may be indicated by uncomfortable therapy, large mask leaks, mouth breathing, dry mouth and throat even with heated humidification, aerophagia (swallowing air), an AHI above the normal 5 or below events per hour, and still feeling tired or sleepy during the day. Some people have concerns that too high a pressure setting may lead to pressure-induced central apneas (the brain not telling the body to breathe) unless the PAP machine algorithm (operating rules) prevent runaways as in Respironics machines. Pressure settings above 15 cm/H2O are considered high for some people; for others, 18, 19, 20 cm/H2O is high.

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[-] MakeSleepAPriority +0 points · almost 3 years ago

Well said StarSleeper! This research network and forums focus on outcomes. In the incidence of CPAP pressures being too high, a community based outcomes study might be to sort the unidentified data from the surveys for everyone on CPAP and look at the range of pressures. Then create a survey to ask about any side effects. If 30,000 people participate and 80% of the ones on a pressure greater than 15 report side effects then the researchers can look further to see what those side effects were. When they get that information they can look at it further to see what the difference was in the 20% of people with pressures over 15 who didn't have side effect. With large numbers of people participating in the surveys there is a lot of strong data that can help direct how treatment is delivered and maintained. APAP machines help keep pressures lower by adjusting it up only when needed then returning to a lower pressure. So already technology is helping CPAP users who need high pressures at times have lower pressures the rest of the time.

The results of surveys and studies like this will be posted here so everyone can get answers to a question like member 144903 asked. You can even propose a question right here on the site. It's cool how that works!

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[-] AdventurousChampagneSeaLion4882 +0 points · almost 3 years ago

Each morning I would awaken with wet hair from clear liquid draining from my ear. Had CTscan and MRI, but we're unable to determine source. Have not ever experienced problem again since lowering pressure and that was over five years ago.

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[-] BraveYankeesBlueFalcon5559 +0 points · almost 3 years ago

Hello,

I was just diagnosed with Sleep Apnea and had problems during the titration sleepover.

They tried the nose pillows and then a mask that only covered my nose, and I could not tolerate either one.

They said the pressure was at the lowest setting but it burned my sinuses and caused me to get a sinus migraine and constant sneezing.

The tech had the humidifier on and turned the heater on to warm the air but nothing helped.

The pressure hurt and burned the same as it does when you accidentally breath in water up your nose when swimming.

The tech sent me home and said she would talk to her supervisor. He called me and wants to try it again but I just don't know what to think

I have to get and use the CPAP in order to get Gastric Bypass Surgery to lose weight, but I don't know how to overcome this problem

I have always been a mouth breather. Any suggestions or anyone who had the same problem and overcame it?

Thanks!

Marsha

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[-] PlacidGoldSquid2493 +0 points · almost 2 years ago

Hi, I'm new here but I ran into the exact same problem (sinus burning sensation), ultimately what helped was the replacement of the filter of the device, hypo-allergenic filter. I use the S8 device and had trouble finding a hypoallergenic filter for it, so I took a standard filter S8, and cut a hypoallergenic filter The S9 dimensions of the filter.

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[-] Jon +0 points · almost 3 years ago

try a full mask that covers your mouth as well. If you mouth breath from sinus/nasal congestion, saline sinus rinse before bed. I use it every night since I had sinus surgery. When congested, I use 2 packets (hypertonic)...

http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=142205&catid=59915&aid=338666&aparam=142205&kpid=142205&CAWELAID=120142990000072055&CAGPSPN=pla&kpid=142205

When I get a head cold, I use 12 hour afrin to open the pipes. ... but for no more than 3 nights in a row.

Finally, I used ambien the first couple of nights and then weaned myself off of it. Talk to your doc about 'knocking yourself' out with ambien. If you prefer something more natural, try a strong cup of "sleepy time extra" Valarian is almost as good. However, you do not want it straight. Smells and tastes like well worn gym socks on its own.

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[-] StarSleeper +0 points · almost 3 years ago

I am not an expert, Marsha, but my understanding is that a full face mask is the answer for people who breathe through their mouth. Otherwise the intended positive pressure just escapes through the mouth.

I can't explain your sensitivity to the CPAP machine because the air is the same, just under a little more pressure. You could be allergic to the materials in the mask and hose I suppose, or some contaminants in the hose?

Have you ever been to an ENT doctor? There might be a reason you breathe through your mouth.

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[-] Will +0 points · almost 3 years ago

Marsha, have you thought of using a full face mask that covers the nose and mouth? This works for many mouth breathers. Plus, air is not just forced up your nose. Masks are like software and CPAPs are like a computer. Computers are no good without the right software. CPAPs are no good without the right mask for you.

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[-] MakeSleepAPriority +0 points · almost 3 years ago

Hello all,

Marsha has an interesting problem with the burning feeling when she uses CPAP. Usually warming and humidifying the air like she tried the night of her study helps that but it didn't for her.

I think this website and forum are a bit different from others. The intent is to look at users' stories, ask questions, find common problems and barriers that result in poor outcomes. In the case of apnea, a poor outcome would be not being able to use CPAP or find another therapy to adequately treat it. All the people who have burning like Marsha could be compared without identifying them....just their stories and research surveys and find things that are common to them but not to the users' who don't have the burning. Then researchers could build some more surveys to ask more targeted questions for users and ultimately they might be able to identify the CAUSE of the burning and more effectively and efficiently treat it. Another important question to answer might be "How many people have so much difficulty getting their apnea treated that they don't have their bariatric surgery?" If it's a lot, there would be a bigger incentive for researchers to find the reasons why. That's how I understand outcomes research works. Invite your friends and relatives to join. The more users there are, the stronger the research will be.

Marsha, please keep posting your journey treating your apnea before and after your surgery. I imagine there are all sorts of questions after surgery that need answering too. Take the treatment suggestions offered here to your doctor for help learning which ones would be safe for you. It's all about what works for you with your special set of circumstances.

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[-] FrankSlateGraySalmon1523 +0 points · over 2 years ago

Hi, I'm using the CPAP for 3 months with a humidifier pressure 8. Low temperature. I have continuous tracheitis, irritaion of the back of my throat, no pathogens present. Horseness at times, continuous irritation feels like thickening in my throat, I have a booking with my ENT specialist. Does anyone had the same experience?

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[-] CompassionateOrangeHeron0106 +0 points · about 2 years ago

Hi frank.. It might be thrush from dry mouth.. Also for marsha have you tried a nasal spray? I wonder if flonase would help at all? Hmm?

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[-] DiligentTanIbis8802 +0 points · about 2 years ago

Back to Jon's original question. Yes harm can be done if pressures aren't right. To high and the extra air hits resepters that tells the brain that you have plenty of air and don't need to breathe. not good. If the pressures are to low your airway isn't being supported well enough and you still have excessive apnic events.

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[-] sleepybeachoyster +0 points · about 2 years ago

I am new to the site. My concern is the same as Jon's. Since I began using my cpap my ability to walk, or do most things involving any level of exertion, just cleaning the house, even talking is becoming more difficult. I am short of breath most days and VERY concerned as I feel it has been a gradual decline. I keep a slight headache daily, which is also an improvement b/c I had severe migraines on a weekly basis before the cpap use. I can take deep breathes, however I breathe shallow most of the time, is this a condition of the long term cpap use?? Dx with restless leg syndrome- at 2mg requip and still kicking uncontrollably in deep sleep, which initially caused the sleep study. Dx in 2013 with sleep apnea using cpap at 14. I feel a lot better, average 6 hrs-on and off sleep, which is great considering some nights I didn't sleep at all.

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[-] HelpfulElectricBlueKudu2634 +0 points · almost 2 years ago

Also new to the site. Sleepybeachoyster made some comments that ring true for me. My energy level is way down. Doing the slightest exercise gets me exhausted. Out of breath and very tired (weak feeling) muscles throughout my body. I have noticed that I breath shallow as well. I wake with a slight headache and "fuzziness". I do not know my prescriptive numbers but it seems to me that the pressure is much higher than when I first got the machine. Sleepyeachoyster have you learned any more about your tiredness since your posting 2 months ago? Need help! Tanks all.

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[-] DanM +1 point · about 2 years ago Sleep Enthusiast

Hi @sleepybeachoyster. The symptoms you describe are not usually related to CPAP use. Hopefully, CPAP actually improves energy levels. Patients do often describe a reduction in amount and/or severity of headaches if they had morning headaches prior to use. I encourage you to speak to your physician about these other symptoms you are experiencing to see if they may be caused by other health conditions or are possible medication side-effects. Best wishes, and please keep us posted!

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[-] SincereOrangeRedWallaby1147 +0 points · almost 2 years ago

Hi! I am new to the forum. I have been using a CPAP for 15 years. Over the past yaer I have had some challenges with treatment. This has been unexpected bc I initially had no issues with treatment. My weight has not changed (unfortunately-I could stand to loose weight). My challenges have been mouth breathing, then switching to a full face mask, followed by swallowing air and waking with discomfort in my abdomen as a result. My pressures have not changed and I have had my CPAP functioning tested. Any suggestions you can provide would be helpful.

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[-] DonnieG -2 points · almost 2 years ago

Please go to Inspiresleep.com and read about Inspire. I had an Inspire implanted for a year and it solved my sleeping problem. My masks and snoring was driving my wife to other end of our home.

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[-] DanM +1 point · almost 2 years ago Sleep Enthusiast

Hi @SincereOrangeRedWallaby1147. Swallowing air can be uncomfortable. It may be caused because of too much air pressure or because pressure is too low (causing you to gasp for air that you swallow). Even though you have had your CPAP machine function tested, I may recommend that you ask your physician or home care company to look at your data download. Switching to a full face mask can sometimes change your pressure needs. Some patients report that sleeping on a slight incline helps. I use an APAP machine, which adjusts the air pressure based on my breathing. I like it because I only get the amount of air that I need vs. a constant pressure. Hope this helps!

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[-] wiredgeorge +0 points · almost 2 years ago Sleep Enthusiast

I am at 25/20 on a Bipap and have no discomfort whatsoever. I do occasionally have my mouth fill with air IF I keep my mouth a bit open. This is annoying as I have to push the air out of my mouth and it makes unpleasant noises (no further explanation needed I hope) AND I generally blow the mask seal. Suspect it is a matter of training as it doesn't happen much these days; I think they have chin straps to help remind you to keep your mouth closed. I feel it is likely that many, if not most, people diagnosed with sleep apnea are mouth breathers because I don't think there would be AHI incidents as frequently if breathing through one's nose as the airway is obstructed when mouth breathing.... just my theory and not sure if it is medically accurate but this is my empirical observation.

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[-] DonnieG -2 points · almost 2 years ago

Please go to Inspiresleep.com. There is good news for you.

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