Forum · Didgeridoo

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[-] Otherwise +0 points · over 1 year ago

I have been using a didgeridoo to help alleviate sleep apnea and snoring for about 4 years. I play it for at least 10 minutes every night shortly before I go to bed. I have never learned circular breathing. I just drone through the thing pretty solidly for 10 minutes. My wife says my snoring is noticeably reduced - I used to snore immediately upon sleeping and had arrested breathing episodes. These do not happen now. I am waiting for an appointment with a sleep lab to possibly be evaluated again after these years of consistent practice.

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[-] DanM +1 point · over 1 year ago Sleep Enthusiast

Great to hear, @Otherwise. Please keep us posted, as there is much interest in the didgeridoo as a potential treatment for sleep apnea!

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[-] UMUTEJDER +0 points · over 1 year ago

Hello dear community friends.

I got uppp surgery before which didn't work to treat apnea.

(uvulopalatopharyngoplasty )

ı saw an article on playind didgerideoo.The article said that it is not possible to play

didgerideoo,if you got uppp surgery before?

how much does it correct ?

this is very important for me,if someone replies.I will be grateful.

Kindly regards,

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[-] AffectionatePearSparrow1072 +0 points · over 1 year ago

I think that not even if the instrument help directly with the disease it is very meditative so it relaxes and reduces your stress.

And that is something beneficial for any disease.

I think you can start with a PVC didgi like AJ has pointed out. So, you can start in less than $5. He is a experienced player and has published some great material on how to play a didgeridoo.

Here are some free tutorials that will help you to learn for free also. http://knowledgemaps.org/learning-journey/1023/learning-to-play-didgeridoo

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[-] Dianna +0 points · over 1 year ago

It is important to note that traditionally a didgeridoo is a male only instrument here in Australia.

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[-] UMUTEJDER +0 points · about 1 year ago

I 've been playing didgerideoo for 2 weeks to cure my sleep apnea and I am planning to play for 3 months.

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[-] ReliableDesertSandKangaroo4707 +0 points · about 1 year ago

I've just been diagnosed with moderate apnea, and my HMO wants to give me a CPAP machine (looooong waiting time). I've been practicing the didge for a month, not just for the apnea, but also because I've liked the sound of it for a long time. I play a couple other instruments... I've read "Didgeridoo playing as alternative treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: randomised controlled trial". Small sample, and not proof of anything, but it's encouraging. So... we'll see. I still have a month before I get my CPAP and I will probably take it - but I might not use it. But here's a question for everyone:

We all know that OSA has some bad correlations - obesity, heart, diabetes. And, there are tests that say that a CPAP reduces apnea. And the studies say that it has "significant" impact on health issues. Okay, but that means "significant statistically": most of the studies leave me wanting a lot more information. They seldom say, for instance, what percentage of users of CPAP improve their blood pressure. Or, among those that improve, what is the average improvement? This study seems to say that average improvement in blood pressure after a year of wearing CPAP is about two points. Is that all? Really? And, that's for people who really wear the device. And after a year. So, I wear a machine for a year and my blood pressure goes from 130/80 to 128/78. That's not bad, but is it worth it?

Similarly, I want to know how much weight people usually lose? a pound? five pounds? fifty? If it was fifty, we would have heard about it. If it was one pound, then that might be "statistically significant", but not very significant from a wellness point of view.

I subscribe to the Google Alert for "Sleep Apnea", and I get a daily summary of links. Most of the links are talking about the CPAP industry, or advertising the services of a sleep doctor, or are very vague about what treatment will do.

If someone else has done more research than I have, I'd love to hear what you found. I'm only interested in credible evidence from medical studies.

Thanks!

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[-] UMUTEJDER +0 points · 9 months ago
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