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Dry mouth with mask being on for 5mins

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biggieb19 +0 points · almost 2 years ago Original Poster

So I've had every heart test done in the book and lungs checked and everything is normal but here I am with daytime shortness of breath which I think is gastril or anxiety issues . But I got a CPAP machine last year and finally decided it's time to start using it . But after 7 masks and 5 pressure adjust I'm struggling . I wear the full face mask. I've turned the ramping down to 5mins and turned the humidity up. But with 5mins of wearing the masks I have instance dry mouth and also feel like my breathing is worse

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Sierra +0 points · almost 2 years ago Sleep Patron

Have you tried a nasal pillow mask? If so what caused you to go to a full face mask?

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · almost 2 years ago Sleep Enthusiast

Yes check everything to do with the mask and mouth because the time frame is too short for most other things but also check the wider environment. Are you sleeping close to a heater or other device that could dehumidify the air? Where is your machine sucking the air from?

Many medications can also cause dry mouth that might not be really pronounced until you start using the CPAP machine.

Also check if the humidifier chamber is warm after it has been on for a while and if it is using enough water.

I wound mine down to 4.0 a few weeks back and it simply stopped working. It took me a few days to realise that I hadn't added hardly any water and it just wasn't warming up. I still don't know why it failed but I wound it up half a point and it works fine again.

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Sierra +0 points · almost 2 years ago Sleep Patron

I have not used it, but at least the ResMed AirSense machines apparently have a warm up mode you can initiate. It takes 20 minutes to bring the humidifier water up to full temperature and then holds it for 10 minutes. So, it may help to initiate it when you are getting ready for bed, if your machine has this feature. I'll try it tonight and I may know more tomorrow! A heated hose can allow a higher humidity, but it probably does not make that much difference in the first 5 minutes...

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biggieb19 +0 points · almost 2 years ago Original Poster

Could be my room is very dry . And there is definitely enough water I made sure .

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · almost 2 years ago Sleep Enthusiast

The dry room doesn't help but it shouldn't have much impact in such a short time and not if the humidifier is working.

I didn't explain very well sorry. The humidifier container should get warm and, as a result should use a fair amount of water. If it's still more than half full the next morning then it might not be doing what it's supposed to.

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Sierra +0 points · almost 2 years ago Sleep Patron

I used the warm up mode on my AirSense 10 last night. My going to bed routine is fairly short, so it only had about 10 minutes to actually warm up. But, it does seem to work. There is a very small amount of air flow while it is warming up.

I have never used it because I have only had dry mouth issues when I was opening my mouth with a nasal pillow mask. I also had it when I woke up after using a full face mask. I was obviously breathing through my mouth. Now that I tape my mouth closed and use a nasal pillow it is no longer a problem.

Edit: I forgot to mention that the warm up mode is turned on with the User Menu on the ResMed AirSense. It is just above the Airplane Mode.

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