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Biguglygremlin

Biguglygremlin
Joined Nov 2018
Bio

Male aged 60+

Overweight

Very Severe Apnea

CPAP user since June 2014

Airsense 10

Pressure <12>

Nasal Pillows

Philips Nuance

RLS PLMD PTSD CFS RBD

Australia

Biguglygremlin
Joined Nov 2018
Bio

Male aged 60+

Overweight

Very Severe Apnea

CPAP user since June 2014

Airsense 10

Pressure <12>

Nasal Pillows

Philips Nuance

RLS PLMD PTSD CFS RBD

Australia

The mask vent is above the soft tubes that suck flat.

It is on top of the head where the main hose to the machine connects.

You can breathe out quite easily with no resistance but the tubes are a one way valve.

Hence my statement that it leaves you with absolutely no air intake at all.

Wander into your nearest CPAP shop and you can test one for yourself. Pop the mask on and hold your hand or a pillow against one cheek and try to breathe.

Paradoxically it is a brilliantly conceived design for comfort and fit and effectiveness under pressure.

Perhaps the prototype used a different grade of silicone but the product that Resmed are selling is dangerously flawed.

It would not be of such a concern to me if I thought that natural reflexes would safeguard the user but they don't.

I use a chinstrap which, arguably you could negate, but that would take a positive instruction.

It would require, not just a reflex to allow the mouth to open, but a conscious choice to actively open the mouth against the tension of the chinstrap and to hold it open against the constant pressure.

It is not a natural and instinctive, unconscious response.

With other masks you have some time to muddle your way to consciousness and remedy the situation but with this mask there is no time.

The initial layout of this thread was designed to show the necessity for a number of steps from emergency wakeup to becoming fully conscious and reactive to urgent circumstances and it could be argued that normal masks do allow enough time for most CPAP users to rectify the problem and recover from the impact but only because there is still a limited airflow. It does not allow for the limitations of zero airflow and it does not allow for the added delays caused by increasing confusion and disorientation and other symptoms of oxygen deprivation nor does it allow for the added liability caused by using CPAP on patients who are already confused or irresponsive due to varying levels of disability or dementia.

I don't doubt that there are situations where SmartStart would prove useful but how many power outages would be short enough for you to hold your breath through them and what about when the shut down is initiated by the machine itself and what if something simple and common happens like the primary hose wriggles loose?

The machine is happily blowing air into infinity and you've had your last gasp.

No matter how many safeguards you put in place the risk still remains in a mask design that can totally obstruct all airflow.

It seems to me that the Resmed Airfit mask is, in itself, inherently dangerous.