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Biguglygremlin

Biguglygremlin
Joined Nov 2018
Bio

Male aged 60+

Overweight

Very Severe Apnea

CPAP user since June 2014

Resmed 9

Pressure <12>

Nasal Pillows

Philips Nuance

RLS PLMD PTSD CFS RBD

Australia

Biguglygremlin
Joined Nov 2018
Bio

Male aged 60+

Overweight

Very Severe Apnea

CPAP user since June 2014

Resmed 9

Pressure <12>

Nasal Pillows

Philips Nuance

RLS PLMD PTSD CFS RBD

Australia

This is a subject that I have been wondering about for some time now, not just because I have a permanent trench across my head from the mask strap that I have worn for 15,000 hours but I also have a CT scan that shows an obvious gully in the bone across the top exactly where the strap goes.

I was not aware of this for the first 50 years of my life, so I can blame it all on the CPAP right?

The following points might seem unconnected because they probably are unconnected.

Yesterday when I was young so many happy songs ........ Oops I digress.

It seems to me that when we were younger the flesh on our skulls was thicker and more resilient. Dents were easily formed in that soft flesh and just as easily faded.

Most of us had no particular need to map the topographical features of our skulls and a thick layer of pliable flesh and an even thicker forest of hair concealed most of the hills and gullies.

I think that as we age the flesh on our skulls becomes thinner and less resilient and the tracks of our mask straps become almost permanent.

So can I blame the CPAP for the dent in my skull?

Unfortunately not, because I think that as the hair and the scalp both got thinner, that gully, which is probably not uncommon amongst adults, became more obvious but, in all likelihood, it was there all along.

So my theory is that in most cases normal processes of ageing have revealed pre-existing anomalies in the skull shape and lack of resilience of the scalp has embedded the path of the straps, perhaps even in the same place, but these factors are most likely unconnected.

Hi Sleeptight

I didn't realise that CPAP went back that far.

I would also like to know if it is possible to escape from the machines after a protracted period of usage although, like yourself, I can't even nap without one.

I doubt that I could reasonably expect to escape from my cursed machine but I believe the question is important and should have been researched and strategies developed and implemented a long time ago, but in an industry that is all about immediate sales and control there is no perceived benefit.

Not sure how the machine itself would answer it Sierra. I doubt that an automatic machine would wind itself off entirely and even a low pressure could make the difference between breathing comfortably and not. Perhaps I am missing something here.

Probably the only way to really know what your current sleep status is would be to cease using the machine and do a sleep study without a CPAP but there must be some aspect that I just don't understand because I suggested doing that in a sleep clinic here and they looked at me like I was a basket case.

Anyways, the airflow is just the physical aspect of it. I wonder what level of dependence is Acquired on a psychological and emotional level especially when so many CPAP users seem to be dealing with (or end up acquiring) anxiety issues.

I have tried to raise this query before from a number of different angles but this forum seems focused exclusively on supporting CPAP usage, which may be a worthy cause, but the result is that serious doubts and escape options are largely ignored and effectively taboo.

The irony of it is that serious questions and diligent research that helps us attain comprehensive answers and increased understanding usually leads to new fields that can also be exploited and converted to revenue.

Avoidance of these kinds of queries and the issues underlying them is just short term thinking.

I didn't mean to be critical of the doctors SleepDent and I apologise for my lack of tact. I was just depicting the world as I see it. BUG's world.

Most doctors I know are largely unwilling participants in this whole debacle and those that are willing are often zealots who believe in what they are doing.

What I see as the sleep industry is primarily driven by insurance companies who have become expert at manipulating our laws and policies.

They effectively dictate to the government and the health industry and largely control the flow of money in all these areas.

They function on the same principle as the casinos. The more money being spent the more they benefit.

It is in their interests to make every aspect of health as expensive as humanly possible.

The sleep industry in general (clinics and manufacturers) has thrived in this enriched environment.

So how did they accrue so much power?

An escalating scare campaign was an excellent opening strategy.

Lowering the bar to include a vast chunk of the population was a good secondary move.

But they really trumped the game when they were able to threaten peoples jobs and licences.

What's the next step?

Compulsory testing of everybody for normal drivers licenses?

Random workplace testing?

An Apnea free certificate required to stroll down the sidewalk?

Yes let's do it!

I love the fact that many places are legalizing marijuana yet you could lose your license and your job if you are caught snoring! :)

With some clever manipulation of numbers and careful omissions the whole industry has fabricated a false reality and accrued an unbelievable level of power and authority.

I am not questioning the reality of serious levels of Apnea nor the necessity to find treatments.

I have a CPAP machine that I use all the time.

I don't object to companies and industries making money, even insane amounts of money.

It is the misleading claims and abuse of power that I would question.