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Biguglygremlin

Biguglygremlin
Joined Nov 2018
Bio

Male aged 60+

Overweight

Very Severe Apnea

CPAP user since June 2014

Airsense 10

Pressure <12>

Nasal Pillow

Airfit P30

RLS PLMD PTSD CFS RBD

Australia

Biguglygremlin
Joined Nov 2018
Bio

Male aged 60+

Overweight

Very Severe Apnea

CPAP user since June 2014

Airsense 10

Pressure <12>

Nasal Pillow

Airfit P30

RLS PLMD PTSD CFS RBD

Australia

I have never been in favor of lessening the parameters, and I am very dubious about any process that brings more women and children into the domain of the sleep industry.

I believe that much of what is currently accepted as fact regarding Apnea, especially what is defined as mild Apnea, is based on a cumulative consensus built on probabilities and assumptions.

It seems to me that we are already at the point where the vast majority of men could be diagnosed with Apnea, to what purpose?

Are we aiming to inflict CPAP therapy on everybody?

I've cared for children with severe Apnea and yes it is a serious concern but is CPAP the answer?

Regarding women, why would their oxygen levels need to be different or the duration of their events?

I fail to understand why we would want to rig the diagnostic process to equal the genders when it comes to the numbers of supposed Apnea victims.

Surely the diagnostic process for women and children should be based on symptoms connected to proven health outcomes.

The heart monitoring process sounds interesting but once again it is founded, at least in part, on assumptions.

Wouldn't minor discomforts and dreams also alter the heart responses?

Many things impact heart function when we are sleeping.

Even if we could isolate and quantify some of the causes it might not directly establish a proven link to long-term health implications.

It seems to me that exercise, stress, and stimulation, are so closely related that the labels are interchangeable, at least within reasonable parameters.

I live in a crazy world, a world without boxes, a world of chaos, but the interesting thing about chaos is that everything is connected and there are endless shifting patterns.

I agree that the vacuum might have a small benefit, largely because it is the opposite to increased pressure, both of which might impact on obstructions in the windpipe, but that brings us back to the blankets and Google is rather vague on that subject.

Some parameters might be helpful.

Most people nowadays buy quilts or doonas or ultra-lightweight acrylic blankets all of which are thick and fluffy and relatively light.

As with all things human, there is a trend in the opposite direction with deliberately weighted blankets that are guaranteed to cure cancer and prevent alien abductions. They even come in a version with metal rings which might help you sleep better when the partner is really miffed. (Just joking folks!)

My above query was not referring to any of those but just to the older style wool or cotton blankets that are thin, but relatively heavy.

In my imagining there can be little doubt that if someone is lying on their back and have three or four of those bunched up and tucked under the chin the weight directly on the throat would almost certainly compound any existing breathing difficulties even without the added weight on the chest and if you take the CPAP out of the picture and really chill the room the tendency to snuggle down, under the blankets, would drop oxygen levels significantly in those already pre-disposed.

It is ironic, and disconcerting, that so many of the searches to do with breathing problems amongst the aging echo back to the same issues for babies.