Forum · Mouth Dryness

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[-] UnassumingPlumFrog3821 +1 point · 6 months ago

I've used a CPAP for over ten years, but recently my first machine quit working properly. Now have a new one (ResMed Air Sense). I've had problems with too much air pressure, but that was fixed yesterday when I went to the sleep doctor associated with the lab that re-tested me. Last night I was looking forward to my first night of good sleep, but instead kept awakening with an extremely dry mouth. I use a mask with nasal pillows. The sleep doctor yesterday didn't feel that I needed a chin strap, but he did suggest a slightly different mask, but again, just a nasal one, not a full face. Advice would be helpful.

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[-] Ruby +0 points · 6 months ago

I had the same problem with a nasal pillow but I only tried one. I am a mouth breather (sometimes) so I went with a full face mask. I still have that problem occasionally but if I use my humidifier it really helps.

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[-] Sleep +0 points · 6 months ago

Were you using a nasal pillow mask prior to the machine change? A nasal pillow mask can be more drying to your airways than a nasal mask. Are you using heated humidity? That can really help. You mention your cpap pressure has changed, has the amount of air increased? That could possibly be some of the reason for the dry mouth.

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[-] UnassumingPlumFrog3821 +0 points · 6 months ago

My pressure was lowered, not upped. Yes, I have always used the nasal pillows. My first machine (from 10 years ago) was a ResMed also. I had NO problems adjusting or with mask leakage or with mouth dryness with the older, simpler machine. IMO, the mask was more comfortable also, plainer, simpler, but more comfortable. One night I even went back to the old machine and the old mask, just to compare, and it was heaven! Incidentally, my mouth dryness issue has gone away, maybe because of using a mouth moistening gel or maybe not--hard to tell.

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[-] HonestSapphireHerring3662 +0 points · 6 months ago

I use nasal pillows. I have to turn up the humidifier different times of the year. I was a mouth breather, but wanted to force myself to learn to breathe through my nose. The pillows have helped me do that. So even when camping now I breathe through my nose.

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[-] wiredgeorge +0 points · 6 months ago Sleep Enthusiast

Anyone can have their mouth open while sleeping as their jaw goes slack. If you mouth is open, you will use a lot more water from the humidifier tub and you will have dry mouth. I use an Amara View which is a full face mask but fits up against your nose but covers your mouth. You still have to figure out how to keep your mouth inside the mask because of jaw slackening but it is comfortable and has eliminated my dry mouth issues I had for the first year of use with another mask and higher leak rates.

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[-] barbz +0 points · 6 months ago

Instead of a separate chin strap to hold my jaw up and still be able to relax it, I make a strap that goes from one side lower mask hook up to the other side. I make these from past head gear parts with the Velcro, those Velcro cable ties and also form an old Oracle neck strap. Because I do not push down heavily on my impromptu chin strap, it does not mess up the way the mask fits.

I just got the AirFit F20 with the magnetic connections. At first I was worried that my chin strap would break the magnetic connection. Nope!

As I make my chin strap, I test the length several times to make sure it does not mess things up. I also put some padding on the strap for comfort. Right now, my old Oracle strap has some flannel wrapped once around and very loosely stitched so if I need to adjust it, it is not a big hassle. Hey...got my photo in! Hope it helps. Sometimes I just wrap strap with cotton and it is not as bulky

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[-] UnassumingPlumFrog3821 +0 points · 6 months ago

Thanks for all the advice! Strangely, I had the mouth dryness problem for only one night. I bought some mouth moistening gel from the drugstore and use it before bed. Also I turned the humidifier up to the highest setting. So far, these tactics have helped. Thanks for the advice; I particularly was interested in barbz's idea of making a chin strap. I ordered a strap from Amazon, but it seems too "invasive" to me; I like the idea of the home-made one better.

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[-] DeterminedCarmineSalamander6265 +0 points · 5 months ago

DRY MOUTH --- While not perfect this procedure has helped me. My BiPAP is set as 21/15 (Pressure in/pressure out). Ever since I moved from a CPAP to a BiPAP I have suffered from DRY MOUTH. MY SOLUTION --- 1. I use NASAL PILLOWS (successfully) 2. I usually use #2 on my humidifier (if I use a higher setting it usually runs out of water) 3. I use a cheap cervical collar (tried a chin strap but had no luck) 4. Sometime I also tape my mouth shut with 3M Microspore Tape 5. I use 2 OraCoat XyliMelts when I go to sleep! 6. Since I use a diuretic (I am 76) I need to get up twice during the night to empty my bladder. The XyliMelts are usually melted and I insert another one each time I get up. The collar, tape and XyliMelts (mint flavored or plain) are all available at Amazon.com. Give it a try!

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[-] barbz +0 points · 5 months ago

Love XyliMelts!

I alternate with a nasal mask at times and agree that the soft cervical collar is the way to go. While I tape my mouth when using a nasal mask, it is not horizontally. I put a 1/2 inch wide strip of tape vertically. I cut enough tape to cover the sticky side where it touches my lips. My skin cannot handle heavy taping.

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