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Y2j1915 +0 points · 6 months ago Original Poster

I was diagnosed with sleep apnea a little over five months ago I live in a group home in Las Vegas Nevada and when I first got my CPAP machine I didn't like using it I was then told I had no choice in the matter it was mandatory at least according to my group home manager because Medicaid won't pay for it if I don't log so many hours using the machine now I've been told that apparently I snore loudly and sometimes scream in my sleep and this CPAP machine stops this apparently and my reaction is… And? I don't care that I snore or scream during my sleep I don't hear it doesn't bother me and I don't live with anyone else that's affected by it so ultimately why should I care? From what little I've read apparently it can take weeks before any noticeable improvement takes place sleep quality wise? I'm not the most patient person at times and I'm already annoyed by my CPAP machine as it is especially because the mask I was prescribed tends to come off during the night so that completely defeats the purpose of the machine right there I understand the health risk for sleep apnea but if all I do is snore and scream and it's not bothering anyone what's the point?

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · 6 months ago Sleep Commentator

hi y2j1915,

I doubt that CPAP will stop the shouting or screaming but most heavy snorers have other symptoms like tiredness during the day and rising blood pressure.

I can understand your intolerance. I feel the same most of the time.

You could get some helpful advice from this forum but they will need some numbers to start with.

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Y2j1915 +0 points · 6 months ago Original Poster

What kind of numbers exactly?

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · 6 months ago Sleep Commentator

I can only guess but why don't you start with the type of machine and current settings and whatever numbers you know already as well as mask type and send the info in a reply to Sierra below because this is not a field I know much about.

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Sierra +0 points · 6 months ago Sleep Innovater

You could start with the make and model of machine you are using, the specific mask model, your pressure settings on the machine. For an auto machine there will be a minimum and a maximum pressure. Do you know what your AHI number was at diagnosis, and what it is now when using the CPAP?

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · 6 months ago Sleep Commentator

My doubts regarding shouting or screaming are based on my own experience and may not relate to you at all.

I have always had restless leg sleep disorder but over the past decade I have added REM sleep movement disorder to my repertoire of nighttime issues.

For me it means that the motor-control blocks fail and I shout or scream and kick or punch or launch myself out of bed when I am asleep.

My CPAP machine lives in a state of perpetual fear knowing it will get totally destroyed one of these nights, but, more to the point it does nothing to prevent these actions.

Hopefully whatever occurs for you whilst sleeping is totally different and more easily rectified. :)

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Sierra +0 points · 6 months ago Sleep Innovater

The main health risk with apnea is the oxygen desaturation periods when you stop breathing. Lack of oxygen to the brain is not good over the long term. Stopping snoring is just a cosmetic side benefit.

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