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Silencing a Snorer for your sleep may not be the best approach

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TheSleepAmbassador +0 points · 4 months ago Original Poster

A colleague just shared this review of the Bose Noise-Masking Sleepbuds. I took a look because Bose makes great products. https://www.imore.com/bose-noise-masking-sleepbuds-review

However, reading the comment of a happy user left me concerned. She stated, "One of my own personal sleep challenges has been my husband's snoring, and Bose sleepbuds have eliminated that issue entirely. While they aren't perfect, they are a must-have product for me, and they might be for you as well." Yet, by silencing his snoring, the risk that he has Obstructive Sleep Apnea is being pushed out of bed. In fact, her silence may be contributing to the attendant health risks associated with UNDIAGNOSED and UNTREATED OSA. His noise just may be speaking to her...and to him....to seek evaluation.

I have not looked closer at the product and the attendant literature provided. I would like to think that Bose provides a disclaimer or recommendation for those who snore to seek diagnosis and treatment. In any case, this scenario is indicative of how in the quest for sleep silence, someone else may need to be heard!

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Sierra +0 points · 4 months ago Sleep Innovater

I would agree. This is not likely the right solution to the real problem.

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Sherry +0 points · 4 months ago

This is only a bandaid for a bed partner but doesn't treat the real issue. Hopefully Bose is including a disclaimer!

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SleepDent +0 points · 4 months ago Sleep Commentator

I am a dentist working in dental sleep medicine. People need to remember that snoring is a noise caused by the vibration of intraoral tissues due to restriction in the airway. While not as harmful as OSA(as far as we know currently), it is definitely not optimally good breathing. Therefore it is in the best interest of the patient to deal with it rather than just masking the sound or moving into another bedroom. Arthur B. Luisi, Jr., D.M.D.

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sleeptech +0 points · 4 months ago Sleep Enthusiast

According to the most up to date research I am aware of, the odds are good that if you snore you have sleep apnoea too. So it's worth getting it checked. It wouldn't surprise me if Bose never even thought of it.

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