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sleeping on the side or the back

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gorgeliban +0 points · 26 days ago Original Poster

Hi first I wanted to know if you are sleeping on your back or side, I noticed that if I fall asleep sleeping on the side I get a tube that spins inside itself, and the mask goes down a bit (does not fall but just moves a bit) so I wanted to know in what position you sleep and if there is. Special reason.

And does the fact that the pipe rotates mean that the air comes out less strongly or does it not affect the pressure of the air?

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Sierra +0 points · 25 days ago Sleep Patron

My normal is to sleep on my back until I go to sleep and then I sleep on one side or the other for the rest of the night. Unless your mask starts to leak excessively, pressure should remain the same in all positions. There is a significant amount of intentional leakage (venting) out of a mask. That is how the machine keeps the air fresh in the mask, and how you exhale. The amount leaking due to the tube rotating should be insignificant in comparison to the intentional venting. The machine is adjusting the pressure all night to keep it correct.

The only issue with sleeping on your back is that in some people that increases the probability of having an obstructive apnea event. However, when using a CPAP the machine should increase pressure to prevent that from happening.

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · 25 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

I concur with Sierra on most points.

Before acquiring a CPAP machine, I had very severe Apnea so it became essential to train myself to always sleep on my side because, as Sierra points out, natural Apnea is worsened by the downward pressure of gravity on the front of the airways.

When I was issued with a machine, in order to facilitate the function of CPAP and limit the issues that the masks create, I was encouraged to sleep on my back but it's not so easy to overcome survival instincts and a decade of discipline even if I trusted the machine, which I don't, so the issue became not how to sleep on my back but how to adapt the equipment to how I prefer to sleep.

It seemed to me that the nasal pillows type masks were more adaptable for side sleeping and a stand that suspends the hose above my head helps prevent disasters when I switch sides.

A reasonable amount of leakage is not something that bothers me because, to misquote Sierra, the whole system leaks but still generally achieves it's purpose.

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · 24 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

There might be other reasons for choosing a sleep position. On your back? Side? Face down?

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