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Sudden spike in CA events

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HonestCarmineCattle2572 +0 points · 2 months ago Original Poster

For quite a while I have been crusing with AHI's under 5 and lower. They have been a sum of OA and CA apneas. I have changed my RESMED10 to CPAP mode only with a constant pressure. This has seemed to work fine for me for quite awhile.

The last 2 nights I have API's of 12 and 18 with the vast majorities being CA events. Both these nights I have taken a 1mg lorazepam pill before bedtime. Could this be the cause of these increased CA events.

Any thought would be appreciated. Thank you

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Enthusiast

I know nothing.

But Google knows quite a lot.

Lorazepam

You really need to talk to your doctor or chemist fairly urgently.

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HonestCarmineCattle2572 +0 points · 2 months ago Original Poster

These were prescribed by my doctor and I take no other medications that would cause an such an interaction according to GOOGLE. My intuition seems to tell me that you disdain these drugs, however they provide needed benefits to those for whom they have been prescribed. The first sentence of your reply seems to have been sufficient.

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Enthusiast

I agree entirely. "I know nothing." :)

No Disdain

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Sierra +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Patron

I really have no experience with these drugs. This link seems to suggest they may aggravate apnea. This article also seems to suggest that a similar but different Z class drug like Ambien could be better than a benzo. I recall that some people get prescribed Ambien to relax them when doing a sleep apnea test in the clinic.

A few weeks ago I had a cataract surgery and they gave me an Ativan as a sedation, which is lorazepam. I checked back in my SleepyHead records and compared the CA events for the day before, that night of the surgery, and the day after. There was no significant difference for me, as each night my CA index was about 1.0, which is a little higher than average, but not out of the normal range.

If you consistently see CA events elevated it would be good to discuss it with your doctor to perhaps try something different like Ambien.

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HonestCarmineCattle2572 +0 points · 2 months ago Original Poster

I had unpleasant experiences for the brief period that I tried Ambien years ago. One of its side effects is "sleep walking". I stopped taking it when I noticed empty bowls on my nightstand in the morning, having no recollection of how they got there. I have heard others actually driving under its influence without their remembering. Call me old fashion, but I prefer either awake or asleep.

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Sierra +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Patron

I recall that Tiger Woods may have had that issue with Ambien, along with running into fire hydrants, among other things....

I have found some of the CBTi tips at this site helpful in sleeping through the night. I find that building up sleep demand by avoiding naps during the day, and not trying to sleep any more than about 7.5 hours a night helpful.

SleepWell It's No Dream

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PutSleepApneatoBed +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Commentator

There’s another reason to avoid sleeping meds. If you have sleep apnea, the only thing that keeps you alive is that you DO wake up to breathe.

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