What's the big deal

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drgene5105 +0 points · 12 months ago

I have been using a BiPAP since march 22, 2017 after diagnosed with severe sleep apnea. I really didn't have many symptoms other than snoring, I wasn't really tired or falling asleep during the day. I would get drowsy at times but nothing extreme. I yawned a lot, or so it seemed to me. I love sleeping through night! I couldn't believe the first night I never got up once! That's still the case. But other than that, I notice nothing. I still yawn a lot, I don't feel any different (no better, no worse). My AHI is around 3. I have read people talking about life changing responses to using their machine. I certainly will not quit using it, I love sleeping through the night but other than that, I just think "so what?" I can't be the only one

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sleeptech +0 points · 11 months ago Sleep Commentator

I can tell you that there is small but significant proportion of sleep apnoea sufferers who are asymptomatic. That meas that, like you, they don't really feel or show any ill effects of OSA. The good news is that means you have treated it before it has caused any major damage. If you had a proper sleep study, they will have been able to see every breath you do or do not take, so if they saw you stop breathing then it probably is so. Don't worry if you don't notice much difference other than sound sleep. It can only do you good. And, believe me, while you may not think it looks sexy, it's a darn sight more appealing than a snore. I have had hundreds of spouses attest to this.

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drgene5105 +0 points · 11 months ago

i agree. i think partially, my expectations were higher that i would feel 'different' - whatever that meant. i don't feel any better or any different, which means i also don't feel any worse! my wife said just last night how thankful she was that i did my sleep study and have my machine. i look forward to going to sleep. i'm also one of those people who do NOT remember my dreams now very much. before my machine, i looked forward to going to sleep and having lots of crazy dreams. now, most mornings i wake up and cant' remember any dreams at all. but that's a small price to pay for a full nights sleep.

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wiredgeorge +0 points · 11 months ago Sleep Enthusiast

When you have an apnea event, you quit breathing for some duration. When you quit breathing, you O2 level can go into the tank. When you brain and organs quit getting oxygen, well, it ain't good, as they say. Snoring is annoying but brain damage is a bit more serious. drgene5105, what did your SPO2 levels drop to and for what duration?

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drgene5105 +0 points · 11 months ago

can't tell you, i don't know. my diagnoses was 'severe sleep apnea, 30+ episodes per hour. i do from reading that O2 level drops cause lots of other issues, which includes frequent urination. THAT alone is a benefit. sleeping through the night and not having to get up to urinate 2 or 3 times or more. the first night with my bipap, i slept through all night for the first time in years.

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wiredgeorge +0 points · 11 months ago Sleep Enthusiast

I am not a medical professional but my opinion on the subject of frequent urination is that when you don't drop into deep sleep but only "cat nap" between apnea events, it is easy to wake a bit and when I wake, I just get up to hit the rest room. I got up a bunch to do this before therapy and now almost never do. I think it is because I am sleeping deeper. Whatever the real cause of frequent trips to the toilet at night, once they are gone, it is really a good thing.

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