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CharmingSalmonSeaLion

CharmingSalmonSeaLion
Joined Nov 2014
Bio

Recovering attorney, retired. Suffered from OSA misdiagnosed as insomnia for most of my life, which led to DM2 , etc. Interested in mass screening,and testing.

CT and FL, USA.

CharmingSalmonSeaLion
Joined Nov 2014
Bio

Recovering attorney, retired. Suffered from OSA misdiagnosed as insomnia for most of my life, which led to DM2 , etc. Interested in mass screening,and testing.

CT and FL, USA.

As a point of disambiguation, the 3.2 number you were seeing on your machine’s sleep report was likely your residual AHI, I.e., the apneas and hypopneas that remained despite or AFTER treatment. And that number isn’t too bad. The AHI of 21 was probably the average through the whole night without treatment. Those numbers are in no way contradictory or inconsistent. So, if that’s the reason you are questioning the test results, I think you can relax. But if it is for some other reason, let the folks here know.

It’s also important to note the difference between your AHIs during REM and nonREM Sleep, which can be very different, plus your O2 desat levels. For example, I had an average AHI of 19, but obstructed 83 times an hour during REM Sleep (when I could even get into REM sleep, which wasn’t often. There was an overlooked clue:from puberty on, I never remembered dreaming, but the reality is, I WASN’T dreaming, because I coildn’t remain in REM sleep.

I would also regularly desaturate below 60, which is life threatening and very hard on your cardiovascular system. It also kills beta cells and leads to DM2. And I awoke every night after 3.5 hours of sleep, unable to stay asleep or get back to sleep, because in REM, my body had to choose between sleeping and breathing. Fortunately for me, it chose breathing. Some people aren’t so lucky.

Some people desaturate very badly and suffer life threatening consequences from the hypoxia. Other people suffer more from the sleep fragmentation and respiratory arousals. There are many different subtypes of Sleep Apnea and many co-morbidities.

Congratulations on getting diagnosed. Most people suffering from sleep apnea remain undiagnosed, and will have a miserable quality of life. and many will die prematurely, never knowing what was wrong, or having had a chance to treat it. You have the chance to beat that rap.

Treatment IS worthwhile. Hang in there and fight for your health and well being!