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Airsense 10 Tubing with Too Much WAter

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Marv +0 points · over 2 years ago Original Poster

I have an airsense 10 which has worked well for a long time. Recently, I purchased a new heated tube (this is not a new item to me, as I had been using the heated tube since the beginning.) Oddly, this new tube is getting too much water in it, and it starts 'gurgling' when I breathe. The fix is to take it off and run the water out and then go back to sleep. But, two or three nights later, the same thing occurs.

My thoughts are that the tube is not heating properly. So, does anyone know how to test the tube? I am fairly adept at using an Ohm Meter, just not sure what I should be finding. I tested the tube (and the original, which did NOT get so much water in it) and the tested alike. Now I'm stumped. What am I doing wrong?

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Sierra +0 points · over 2 years ago Sleep Patron

Normally the machine should detect that you have a heated hose when you plug it in to the back. It will normally pop up a grey screen saying it is detected. "Climateline Air Connected" with a check mark in the top left of the window. Make sure you are getting that confirmation. Next check that the Humidity is set to Auto in the Setting menu on your machine. I just keep mine in Auto and the temperature set at 27 deg C, and have no problem with rainout. Each time you start the machine up to use it a status screen will come up. I recall those settings of Auto and the temp of 27 are displayed along the bottom of the screen. If the readings with the Ohm meter are the same this would suggest there is nothing wrong with the heating coil in the tube.

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Marv +0 points · over 2 years ago Original Poster

I am getting the notice that it is connected. Although, a few months back, I raised the humidity (temp?) because I was having trouble with dry mouth. Raising this defeated that problem. This 'rain out' issue has only come up since I got this new tube. Im in a quandary....

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SleepyMommy703 +0 points · over 2 years ago Sleep Commentator

I was told I would have to adjust the temp based on the room temp and/or humidity level. That said, I never got it to work well so I had to turn the heated part off and just use it like a regular hose. I had too much rain out so I went back to using the regular hose. Did you possibly move the position of the machine? I also have to keep mine on the floor as it helps.

I've had defective parts before so anything is possible. If nothing else works call your medical supply company and check with them.

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Marv +0 points · over 2 years ago Original Poster

Purchased over the internet. May be difficult....I will contact them though.

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snuzyQ +0 points · over 2 years ago Sleep Commentator

Hi SleepyMommy703:

The best spot to position your CPAP is on an end table or night stand that is level with the top of your mattress (without covers on). Placing it there or lower is preferred. If the CPAP machine is placed above the level of the top of your mattress, rainout becomes likely. I came across this information on the former ASAA forum and it became quite useful - especially when traveling.

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Sierra +0 points · over 2 years ago Sleep Patron

The Humidity and the temperature are two independent settings. I put my Humidity in Auto, and the Temp I set at 27 deg C, which is about 81 F. These settings have worked well for me over quite a wide range of temperature and humidity conditions. My AirSense 10 machine is located slightly above my head, so if it gave moisture problems I should notice it.

If your user menu does not give you the access to set the Humidity to Auto and set the Temperature, you may need to go into the Clinical Menu to change the setup a bit first. See the link below to the Clinical Manual on how to do this. See pages 14-16. Under the Options section there should be an item called Essentials. If you select it there are two choices. Select Plus. That will give you more access from the User menu.

Mine is set to Plus. If under Humidity I select Auto then the only other option is temperature. If I select manual then another option pops up for Humidity Level. That may have been what you changed. I would try setting the main Humidity option to Auto and temperature to 27 c or 81 f. There is a section on troubleshooting as well, and there is a manual for the Climate Air Line as well.

Clinical Manual

Climate Air Manual

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sleeptech +0 points · over 2 years ago Sleep Enthusiast

Simple first response if you have heated tube and are getting condensation as you describe: turn up the tube temperature. The humidification level is to stop your mouth getting dry and the tube temp is to stop rain-out. It is always possible that your tube is dodgy. I had that with a patient a few days ago.

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Neil +0 points · over 2 years ago

I am not sure what the resistance would be, but I think the failure mode would be open and the resistance would be over 50 K ohms. So it should be between 3 and 50,000 ohms.

You said you have the trouble after 2 or 3 nights. I'm not an expert, but I think it should be dry between uses if you want to avoid bacteria growth. I disconnect the hose and hang it up when not in use. If the heat is working right, you can still get condensation after you turn off the machine.

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Sierra +0 points · over 2 years ago Sleep Patron

From the ResMed Battery Guide (page 22) it seems that the current draw for a ClimateLine set to 30 C, and humidifier setting of 8, draws 1.02 amps more than the Slimline hose and the humidifier set at 8 (both for same pressure setting). From the V=IR or R=V/I formula this suggests a resistance of about 24 ohms assuming they are using the full 24 volts that the machine power supply delivers.

As I understand it they measure temperature at the end of the ClimatLine so there must be a thermocouple there. The three wires of the hose would then probably be a common ground, plus one with the heating current, plus one that goes to the thermocouple.

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AlwaysTired +0 points · about 2 years ago

It could possibly be that the water level is too high. I have overfilled mine and it did the same thing.

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wiredgeorge +0 points · about 2 years ago Sleep Enthusiast

When I first started therapy, I thought the water line to be suggestion and filled it quite a bit above the water line and sucked a bunch of water up my nose. Have not thought to try it again. The OP hasn't been back to follow up for about 3 weeks so likely suggestions at this point are not getting through to the OP.

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