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Has anyone ever tried "Homesleep.Study"?

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singingkeys +0 points · 19 days ago Original Poster

It is basically a mail-order home sleep study. https://homesleep.study/

Apparently it is $299 with free shipping and they ship you this device called SleepView Monitor and the accessories to hook up overnight to do your own sleep study at home. Then you ship it back to them and sleep techs/doctors review it and email you the results. The whole process is supposed to take 7 days total, including the to/from shipping. Just wondering if anyone has tried this service in the past. If it is discovered that you have Sleep Apnea, then they contact you and assist you with getting APAP/CPAP equipment at a "significantly discounted price" somehow. The test is supposed to be able to diagnose Central and OSA.

I looked up said device and it is about $3,200, so definitely a higher-end one that is just made to be simple for patients. https://www.medicaldevicedepot.com/SleepView-Monitor-p/700-0011-1.htm

8 channels, so it checks for Respiratory Effort using a belt, body position, airflow (thermistor and pressure-based), snore (from the cannula), heart rate, pulse oximetry and actigraphy.

It would probably cost the $299 for me to go back for a visit with the sleep doctor "just to talk" for a third time and I no longer have the insurance that paid for a lot of the previous stuff and the sleep study. Think it is a better shot? They sure don't have much interest in my health.

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Sierra +0 points · 19 days ago Sleep Innovater

I have not used that particular setup, but I was diagnosed with a home sleep study device. The particular one used was a Phillips Alice NightOne. They do basically work, but do not give as much detail on sleep status as an in lab test. There is no way to tell when you are asleep. It only knows body position.

A couple of things to watch for is the ability of the machine to tell you it has gathered sufficient data to do an analysis. The Alice NightOne tells you that so you do not send it back only to find that there is insufficient data. Also you may want to consider the purpose of the diagnosis and whether or not it will be recognized by your insurance company etc... Some jurisdictions do not consider them a valid diagnosis.

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singingkeys +0 points · 17 days ago Original Poster

So basically RERA's may not be technically detected by some of these home sleep studies?

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Sierra +0 points · 16 days ago Sleep Innovater

I looked sleep study report which was based on the Phillips NightOne data. They did not report a RERA nor was there a space for them to report it on they form. The newest CPAP machines report RERA but they do not disclose much on how they do it. It is something that perhaps someone could flag manually, but in reviewing the information you posted I do not see any indication that the machine automatically records it.

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singingkeys +0 points · 19 days ago Original Poster

Well, no insurance right now, anyway. I have some money saved, but my sleep doctor's office is being dumb and he wants another visit and still may not write me a prescription for CPAP/APAP. Getting quite frustrated with them and sleep seems to be getting worse.

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Hamguy515 +0 points · 19 days ago

After worsening symptoms over the past few years, I recently opted to go the home sleep test route and couldn't be more pleased with the entire process. I had a "failed" sleep study 6-7 years ago (6 months from PCP visit to sleep study report, only to find out the results were "inconclusive" - but they'd let me sign up for another sleep study at a cost of $3500 if I really thought I needed it...). There is a history of severe OSA in my family, and my symptoms even then were almost down the list - yet I used this "inconclusive" study outcome to convince myself it couldn't possibly be sleep apnea.

Fast-forward to the end of 2018 and I finally decided to take action but wasn't sure I wanted to spend the amount I'd need to get things rolling. I have a high-deductible plan ($5k) and would need to reach that level just to get any help from the insurance... plus a 4-month wait for the local sleep clinic. I found an online resource that offered the home sleep test and would connect you with a board-certified neurologist for the rest of the process - all conducted via telemedicine. 10 days from the time I started the process, I had my diagnosis: Severe OSA with an AHI of 58. This particular company does not accept or work with insurance, but given my high annual deductible and the inflated costs that are often present any time insurance is involved, I've saved money. Plus, I'm also in control of my own treatment, can select the supplier I want to use for my equipment and supplies, and I'm not bound by the inane restrictions imposed by most insurance companies.

I did end up signing up for a program that gives me ongoing access to a "sleep coach" who is also an RRT for a one-time cost, and would strongly recommend that additional resource or something similar. She has been very helpful throughout the entire process and has access to assist with remote changes to machine settings if needed. When I began having significant issues with aerophagia, she was able to work with the original doctor to get my prescription revised to a bi-level machine, while the company I purchased the auto-CPAP from initially offered a 100% credit back when I purchased my AirCurve 10 VAUTO.

I recognize this route isn't for everyone, but I heartily endorse it for those who are so inclined!

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jeffez +0 points · 18 days ago

Wear This Simple Device on Your Finger to Get Complete Assessments of Your Sleep Health + Tailored Tips for Better Sleep . $69

https://shop.pcworld.com/sales/go2sleep-ai-powered-device-for-restful-sleep?utm_source=pcworld.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=go2sleep-ai-powered-device-for-restful-sleep_020519&utm_term=scsf-317065&utm_content=a0x1P000004fpQg&scsonar=1

From PCWorld. Worth a look see to me at only $69. I ordered one with 1st time buyer discount(10%) and $2.99 shipping it cost me $65.09 Waiting arrival next week. Amazon's price is $129.

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singingkeys +0 points · 18 days ago Original Poster

My only concern with the home sleep kit is that it may not detect specific RERA's, which I apparently have a lot of without oxygen drops.

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Sierra +0 points · 7 days ago Sleep Innovater

I think your concern is valid. Best to check into it.

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sleeptech +0 points · 8 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

Without an EEG recording there is no way to tell if you are asleep or what stage of sleep you are in. I'm guessing they use actigraphy to approximate that but it'd be pretty darn rough.

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Hamguy515 +0 points · 6 days ago

There are other methods besides EEG that correlate physiological changes with sleep stages. For example, this device (https://www.itamar-medical.com/watchpat-home-sleep-testing-made-simple/) comes very close (documented 90% correlation) to matching the data from a full in-lab PSG, including sleep architecture - at a fraction of the cost.

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