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Mondayz +0 points · 3 months ago Original Poster

Ahi: 6.9 Oai: 1.4 Cai: 0.3 Lowest desat: 84 Hypopneas: 5.0 per hour / 31 events/ 34.7 mean duration /116.5 max duration

Ox summary

<90% 34.1 minutes <85% 0.2 minutes

Total number of desats: 37. Average sat : 93% Lowest Sp02: 84%

Total snoring episodes :47 Total duration with snoring : 324.6 minutes Percentage of snoring :86.8%

Heart rate

Mean HR: 53.6 bpm Highest HR: 102 bpm

Total monitoring time : 374.1 minutes

Any red flags here ? To me,, it looks like I barely even qualify as having sleep apnea , but I have felt like absolute garbage for 2 ‘Months straight never feeling rested and feeling faint several times a day. Daytime oxygen levels are normal at 98 and above

Any ideas ?

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sleeptech +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Enthusiast

That does indeed look like you barely qualify for mild OSA. However, if CPAP makes you feel better then why not? It is completely harmless. Perhaps an in lab study would reveal more.

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Sierra +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Innovater

Your hypopnea events of 31 combined with a total monitoring time of 374 minutes or 6.23 hours indicates a hypopnea index of 5, the same as they reported. This means they used total monitoring time as the basis, not actual sleep time. Your actual sleep time is likely to be less than 6.23 hours. Say for example it was 4 hours then the real AHI would be about 11. That is about in the middle of the mild apnea range of 5-15.

If you are not getting good sleep you may well benefit from a CPAP. The total snoring time of 324 minutes is certainly a bit of a red flag. A CPAP is very effective in reducing snoring.

If you have to pay for a lab test, and can get a prescription based on your at home test, then you may find it less expensive to just buy a Auto CPAP and try it. The ResMed AirSense 10 Autoset costs about $900 in the US, but if you shop around you may find it for less.

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Mondayz +0 points · 3 months ago Original Poster

Thank you for the replies.

One question I have is this: how bad is it that my Oxygen levels dipped that low? can this cause irreversible brain damage?

Also, even with this (maybe?) low AHI, do you think I could benefit from a CPAP or EPAP anyway to increase oxygen ? Or is that something totally unrelated?

In that case, what could be causing my low oxygen levels at night if not apnea ?

And is the heart rate over 100 and as low as 37 during sleep something to red flag ?

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Sierra +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Innovater

It seems to me that sleep apnea and oxygen desaturation events are just two different ways of measuring the same issue. When you stop breathing then oxygen goes down. In the UK mild (5-15 AHI) does not qualify you for CPAP treatment. I guess the thinking is that it is not serious enough to treat. In North America it is more likely to be treated, as most insurance companies will pay if AHI is over 5.

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bonjour +0 points · about 2 months ago Sleep Commentator

It isn't as much the low as the duration. Medicare says 8 minutes under 88% qualifies for overnight supplemental oxygen. your stat (<90% 34.1 minutes <85% 0.2 minutes) IMHO of <85% no problem, but the 34 minutes, yeah, I would want to do something about that. CPAP use does improve O2 Sats but I would add a recording oximeter (aftermarket) to validate this or I'd accept the results of a titration sleep study. Either solution would work. What Machine, IMHO the ResMed AirSense 10 AutoSet for Her (The plain AutoSet would also be ok).

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