Forum · Workplace performance

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[-] TedB +0 points · almost 3 years ago

Hows does treated or untreated sleep apnea impact your concentration and workplace performance?

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[-] Will +0 points · almost 3 years ago

I find even with treated sleep apnea it often leaves me tired. It would be interesting to study those treated and those hyper-treated with lots of adjustments keeping it truly dialed in.

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[-] Asleepatthewheel +0 points · almost 3 years ago

At what point are we considered chronic fatigue candidates even with 100% successful apap adherence and an average ahi of 2? some of the damage is reversible

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[-] EatandsleepGolf +0 points · almost 3 years ago

I am here to learn, and I wonder what reversible 'damage' you are talking about?

Thank you.

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[-] Kairosgrammy +0 points · almost 3 years ago

<blockquote>I am here to learn, and I wonder what reversible 'damage' you are talking about?

Thank you.</blockquote>

Hi, this is an easy question for me. My brother had sleep apnea for years, probably even as a child. He died in 2010 at the age of 52.I'm convinced he would never had all the health problems that he had if he had been diagnosed much earlier in life. He was knocking on death's door when he was diagnosed. Thanks to a smart doc, he was and it gave us 10 more years we might not have had. Chronic lack of oxygen had caused high blood pressure, congestive heart failure and a whole host of other problems. He couldn't drive any longer because he couldn't stay awake and you'll just as dead if you crash into a tree. Exhaustion takes it's own toll on so many aspects of your life. Although his death occurred so much earlier than anyone would have liked, that bi-pap gave him better health and a longer life. My mother snored as long as I could remember. Looking back at pictures, particularly in the last 10 years of her life (she was 49 when she went to Heaven) I can see the all too familiarr exhaustion on her face. I have no doubt her problems were caused by sleep apnea. After my brother was diagnosed, myself and another sister were both diagnosed. I believe it kinda runs in the family. sigh I feel so much better than I did pre c-pap. More energy and the whole 9 yards. If you haven't been officially diagnosed, go for it. The least it can do is save your life, the most it can do is make your life a whole lot better.

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[-] EatandsleepGolf +0 points · almost 3 years ago

Hi, thank you for sharing this. I'm sorry to hear about your family, I did not know apnea was dangerous like that. Thank you again.

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[-] Kairosgrammy +0 points · almost 3 years ago

It is and not all doctors are onboard. I know when I first talked to my family doctor, he was, like well, if that's what you want to do, I'll get you scheduled but I could tell he didn't put a whole lot of stock in the whole concept. About 4 years ago, I was there for a check up and this same doctor asks me (he's still my doctor) how my sleep has been and I had to be honest, it wasn't anywhere as good as when I first started using my cpap. He sat there and thought a bit and says, "You're sleep apnea may be getting worse. Let's get you re-evaluated." His attitude was totally different and he was right. The medical community is getting more on board with the complications of sleep apnea as there is more and more research showing what it can do. My cpap goes with me and is the first thing I pack when I go on a trip!

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[-] MakeSleepAPriority +0 points · almost 3 years ago

Interesting comments Kairosgrammy. I'm curious, can you remember what information or support might have helped you realize you were not as well treated as you could be? What clues might there have been to let you know you might not have been functioning through your daily activities at the best level you could be?

I noticed a post in the building MyApnea forum that may indicate more people with apnea may still suffer from sleepiness and insomnia than is realized. Maybe they don't recognize it as something that might be able to be fixed.

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[-] Clamalot +0 points · almost 3 years ago

When I finally complained to my doctor that I was tired of being tired he referred me to an ENT doctor who did a sleep study and recommended a UPPP and corrected my deviated septum at the same time. No results! Connected with Beth Israel Deaconess sleep clinic....best decision ever made. Throughout the process I learned that I most likely had it during my teenage years. Fast forward, participated in a research study. Learned about affect on short term memory. Yes, it is affected. After treatment began, night sweats, frequent nighttime urination, morning headaches, heavy chest all went away. I am certain that an uncle had the same thing and passed away at a young age. Turns out I have two brothers that also were diagnosed after myself. Love my machine!!!

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[-] MakeSleepAPriority +0 points · almost 3 years ago

Welcome Clamalot......you make an important point. While apnea isn't "inherited", your body shape and bone structure are and so family members of people with sleep apnea should watch for symptoms of apnea. Snoring, memory problems and sleepiness are so common they often aren't recognized as a sign that something is wrong! Good for you for taking action and getting the whole family healthy.

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[-] Kairosgrammy +0 points · almost 3 years ago

<blockquote>Welcome Clamalot......you make an important point. While apnea isn't "inherited", your body shape and bone structure are and so family members of people with sleep apnea should watch for symptoms of apnea. Snoring, memory problems and sleepiness are so common they often aren't recognized as a sign that something is wrong! Good for you for taking action and getting the whole family healthy. </blockquote>

It was my brother who got us all going. I just wish he'd gotten the solution so much earlier. If he had he might still be alive. I think his went on so long that it caused a whole host of problems. It did give him 10 more years with us and I think God for that. Once he was diagnosed, my sister and I were both diagnosed. Getting the results was scary. My oxygen levels were dropping below 80% all night long. Don't need any brain damage, I'm goofy enough :) And along with the family thing, I think doctors are becoming more aware. Mine certainly did.

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[-] willjim95 +0 points · over 2 years ago

I was the one who suggested a sleep study to my doctor. I had been on and off Zoloft, exercised, ate the right things. I was still waking up at night. Everything from gasping to screaming, "I'm dead! I'm dead!" I thought it was PTSD from my son's passing. Guess what? Sleep apnea. I have had my CPAP machine for two months. First thing I did was wean off my meds for depression. I'm 54 this month. I wish I had had sleep studies 10 or more years ago. At first, the difference in energy level was miraculous. I'm dealing with minor mask adjustments now. Mostly the nose bridge and air blowing in my eyes. I'll get it eventually.

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[-] MakeSleepAPriority +0 points · over 2 years ago

Welcome Willjim95 and good for you for taking your health into your own hands and helping your doctor find a solution. Do you think the change in your "miraculous" energy levels are because at first you could immediately compare with the "old you" and now it is becoming your norm? Anyone else have that experience?

Is the company that provided your CPAP helping with the mask issues? Speak up and ask for help. They are there to help you. Sometimes you lose a little puffiness from your face the first few weeks you use CPAP so need to be checked again for a good fit. That will help you AND the rest of your family sleep better :-)

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[-] Donna +0 points · over 2 years ago

I used to work in home care, setting up CPAP/BiPAP units and helping patients troubleshoot their issues with tolerance of PAP therapy and mask fits. I changed jobs and now work as a registered sleep technician. I also have sleep apnea (and insomnia). I wear CPAP and I love my machine! I never go to sleep without it. I just joined this site, and look forward to helping others who have questions, and I'm sure I'll also learn much from other members! I'm so glad to have found this place!

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[-] SusanR +0 points · over 2 years ago

Welcome Donna and others! This conversation thread shows the range of responses people have with CPAP. In some people, the transformation in alertness and energy is almost overnight (no pun intended!). In others, there is improvement, but some sense of ongoing tiredness, even with good CPAP use. It has been speculated that residual tiredness may be from some irreversible effects on the brain, but there are few concrete data to support this. It also has been speculated that perhaps in patients with residual sleepiness, the sleep apnea is not being completely treated, or there is another sleep problem, or just plain not enough time to sleep. I think a great research study is one which would identify the reasons or causes for differences in "residual sleepiness/fatigue" on CPAP--would some people benefit from different treatments, or do we mostly need to get sleep apnea treated earlier? How does the age when you get sleep apnea influence long term health and brain function? What do you all think? And yes, sleep apnea does run in families and there is active research looking at the genetic basis for sleep apnea.

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[-] Ruby +0 points · over 2 years ago

Susan, this has all been so interesting. As a new person on the forum, it is nice to see the sharing of information. I have used a CPAP machine for 5 years and cannot tell that I feel any better than before. I posted this in a new post earlier today. A research study into residual sleepiness and attention problems would be a wonderful thing. However, I'm not sure I like the idea of it being from irreversible effects on the brain. That sounds so hopeless. I love the ideas on here and am so very happy I found and joined!

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[-] MikeJ +0 points · over 2 years ago

I am 66 and was diagnosed 10 years ago. I had been having dreams of drowning or being unable to breath for years, but decided to do something after falling asleep in the movie Phantom of the Opera. I did think it might be just the latest fad, and no medical provider had ever suggested it, and I don't think I viewed being tired as a medical problem. My father always had trouble sleeping, and my younger brother who died at 58 had sleep apnea. My son also has sleep apnea but has refused to accept treatment because he doesn't like the confined feeling from the mask. When I was first diagnosed, I was told I also have restless leg. I use the CPAP regularly and it helps a lot, though I can't say I actually feel refreshed after sleep. As I get older, the restless leg seems to be getting worse and often need to get up to stretch my legs. Have been prescribed Requip but had augmentation; Neurotin but became suicidal, and Valium which seems to help some, though kind of hazy in the morning so don't take it all the time. It would be wonderful to really get a good nights sleep sometime. I think I have had two nights in the last 15 years where I had a good sleep.

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[-] MakeSleepAPriority +0 points · over 2 years ago

Hang in there Member851026. It would be nice if you could get your son to join. Maybe if he read the struggles of others and the successes, he would come to believe it's worth working at treating his apnea. In fact on an outcomes research site, there may be enough others similarly struggling that together we can find answers. Everyone struggling needs his help....one at a time we'll get to 50,000+ members!

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