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SleepDent

SleepDent
Joined May 2017
SleepDent
Joined May 2017

You really do have a complex and vexing situation. In terms of nasal patency, you already have that covered and have already done every procedure that a person would reasonably want to have done. So the question remains, if you possibly have UARS, what is causing the increased breathing resistance, if not your nose? A possibility is that you just have an unusually small diameter trachea and other breathing tubes leading into the lungs. An ENT could determine that, but I am not sure that I would want to get into that because I think that those endoscopic procedures could be problematic. You might get a consult just to discuss the issue. I would not recommend boil and bite oral appliances to anyone, mostly because they do not work well and do tend to do some damage to your teeth and mouth. The horror stories as to OAs messing up the bite are definitely over-rated. In my practice, it has not been that much of an issue if you use a morning realigner and a good quality appliance properly fitted. In life, lots of things are trade-offs. Which would you hate more, to go through life always feeling lousy and tired, or getting a little tooth movement. Your life-- your choice. I would focus your attention on one appliance in particular, the Luco Hybrid appliance. It is not very well known, but excellent for comfort, low potential for tooth movement, and restoring EXCELLENT levels of oxygenation. It is really good for UARS. See: www.lucohybridosa.com. Dr. Luisi

I am a dentist working in dental sleep medicine. Yes, there are other patients with the same concerns. First of all, the device should be firmly on the teeth and there should be some resistance to removal, but you should not have a life and death struggle to get it out. If you do, it could just be on too tight. You need to make an appointment with your sleep dentist to loosen it up somewhat. It can be done. Secondly, make sure that you do not try to remove it bilaterally(from both posterior sides at once). this is very hard to do. Instead start by removing it from one posterior side or the other and just "peel" it off. Thirdly, when you start to remove the DreamTap, open your jaws gently(don't hurt your TMJs) to put tension on the trays. They remove more easily that way. Fourthly, if all else fails, you can spray a bit of original Pam cooking spray on the inside of the trays. That will grease them up and they remove more easily that way. If you are getting too much saliva in your mouth and that is making you uncomfortable, ask your dentist if taking one OTC Benadryl before bedtime is O.K. for you. If it is, that would greatly help that problem. People can usually ween themselves off the Benadryl in about a week. These suggestions should get the job done for you. If they don't, perhaps you need have another consultation with the dentist. A few people just can't get past the feeling that the two trays are joined. If so, your dentist may need to go to another design where the two trays are not joined and you can open and close your mouth. Arthur B. Luisi, Jr., D.M.D., The Naples Center For Dental Sleep Medicine