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Covid-19 Complications and Outcomes: Sleep Apnea and CPAP Treatment

Submitted by Susan Redline, MD, MPH. Professor of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School As many people are aware, obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes are associated with more severe Covid-19 infections. However, an important question is whether sleep apnea is an unrecognized or hidden risk factor for complications from Covid-19 and whether positive airway pressure (PAP), used to treat sleep apnea, changes this risk. Keep reading

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By MyApnea on September 22, 2020 Sep 22, 2020 in Research

Study Suggests Women May Be Undertreated for Sleep Apnea

For a long time, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was considered to be a disease that mostly affected men. Today, women are being diagnosed more often. But still, 3-to-5 times more men are diagnosed than women. MyApnea founder, Dr. Susan Redline, and a team of researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Yale School of Medicine set out to understand how sleep apnea presents in men and women and its impact on diagnosis and health impact. For a long time, Dr. Keep reading

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By RebeccaR on December 4, 2019 Dec 4, 2019 in Research

Why Patient-Directed Research Is Good For Business

This post summarizes a recent article published in MIT, Sloan Management Review. Find the full article here The last time we posted, we discussed the concept of patient-initiated research and the “N of 1” approach. Since then, we conducted surveys in 10 countries to learn about all types of consumer-driven product innovations, including those in the medical field. Next, we did more studies to learn about medical-product innovation development, in particular. Keep reading

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By RebeccaR on April 23, 2019 Apr 23, 2019 in Research

Should Sleep Tests Happen at Home or in the Lab?

Patients can be diagnosed with sleep apnea at home using a home sleep apnea test (HSAT) or in the sleep lab with polysomnography (PSG). Several studies have found that medically uncomplicated patients at high risk of obstructive sleep apnea that get diagnosed either way have similar CPAP adherence and patient-reported outcomes. For this reason, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends that either method can be used in these types of patients. Keep reading

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By RebeccaR on July 16, 2018 Jul 16, 2018 in Research

CPAP and Heart Disease

Studies of the associations between sleep apnea and heart disease in large communities of individuals provide strong evidence that untreated sleep apnea increases the risk of developing high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke and premature death. There are known physiological mechanisms to explain how sleep apnea increases heart disease risk, which include injury of blood vessels and the heart muscle. Keep reading

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By SusanR on September 14, 2016 Sep 14, 2016 in Research

Sleep Apnea links to Chronic Peridontitis and Painful TMD

Two bacterial diseases are the leading causes of tooth loss. One is dental caries (tooth decay), and the other is periodontitis (gum disease). Periodontitis affects all of the tissues that hold the tooth in place—the gum, periodontal ligament and the jaw bone itself. Over time, these tissues are destroyed by toxins produced by the bacterial infection and by the immune system’s inflammatory response to fight that infection. Keep reading

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By MyApnea on February 3, 2016 Feb 3, 2016 in Research

Women, Sleep Apnea, and Heart Disease

In a recent study, my colleagues at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Columbia University and Baylor Medical Center and I found that older women are at higher relative risk of developing sleep apnea-related heart disease than older men. This study turns on its head the notion that sleep apnea is a “man’s” disease- that is, traditional thinking that men are both more likely to have sleep apnea and have sleep apnea-related health problems. Keep reading

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By SusanR on September 21, 2015 Sep 21, 2015 in Research

New Frontiers in Treatment: Unilateral Hypoglossal Nerve Stimulation

Unilateral stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve (the nerve that controls the movement of the tongue) is a new treatment for people with moderate to severe OSA who are unable to use continuous positive prtessure therapy (CPAP). CPAP, oral appliances, and some surgeries work “from the outside in” to prevent the tissues from relaxing and blocking the upper airway (nasal and oral passages).1 This nerve stimulation therapy works “from the inside out” to move the muscles and keep the airway open. Keep reading

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By KingmanStrohl on September 10, 2015 Sep 10, 2015 in Research

Didgeridoos: A New Intervention for Sleep Apnea?

"Didgeridoo" by "Bernard Spragg. NZ " is licensed under CC BY 2.0. In 2005, the British Medical Journal published a research study that made the American Thoracic Society International Conference “Top 5 Articles of the Year”, and since has remained a frequently talked about study that has also seemingly gained a cult following. In a randomized controlled research study, Dr. Keep reading

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By DennisHwang on June 29, 2015 Jun 29, 2015 in Research

Diabetes and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea tend to go hand-in-hand Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are both very common, each affecting around 10% of adults in the United States. Unfortunately, T2DM and OSA often go hand-in-hand. It has been known for some time that there are a large number of people who have both conditions, although there is evidence that OSA is often undiagnosed. Keep reading

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By jessiebakker on June 1, 2015 Jun 1, 2015 in Research