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Newbie Questions

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LochNeesieMonster +0 points · 7 months ago Original Poster

Hi guys! I was diagnosed with OSA a couple weeks ago and go in for more info/a CPAP on Saturday. I have some questions for those who have OSA!

Anyone have OSA and not snore? My husband says I only snore (softly) maybe once or twice a month. Maybe I don't snore because I am a tummy sleeper?

Anyone with OSA find they sigh/yawn A LOT during the day? People at work have commented on it for years. People tell me to stop yawning, or ask if I am upset about something. I find that if I am deep in thought/focused it is almost like I forget to breathe, or I breathe really shallowly. Think it is related somehow?

TIA for the responses!

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Sierra +0 points · 7 months ago Sleep Innovater

Snoring is common for those with apnea. Apnea and snoring tend to be worst when you sleep on your back, so perhaps that is why you may be avoiding it most nights. Have not heard about the yawning issue during the day. Do you feel rested during the day, or are you tired?

What was your AHI at diagnosis? If you have any say in what kind of machine they give you I would lobby for an Auto machine that adjusts your pressure automatically during the night. And if they push you into a fixed pressure machine ask for one that captures detailed data on a SD memory card in the machine. And if you have a choice in brand of machine, ResMed and DreamStation are the most popular and best. The ResMed AirSense 10 AutoSet For Her, is a particularly good on for women, (and also men that have lower pressure needs).

And with respect to a mask, it may be difficult to get one that allows you to sleep on your tummy. Something to discuss with your sleep technician.

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · 7 months ago Sleep Commentator

Hi LockNeesieMonster

I like the name. :)

I read something about sighing recently.

If I can round up a few neurons and interrogate them I'll get back to you.

Ok I had to resort to drastic measures but eventually one neuron confessed.

SIGHING DYSPNEA : A CLINICAL SYNDROMEā€¯+

I'm not saying it's related to your symptoms but it's an interesting read.

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · 7 months ago Sleep Commentator

This article is worth reading for it's coverage of a number of breathing problems.

The Sigh and Meaning of Sighing - Breath Dysregulation: Low CO2

I thought this was a succinct summary.

"Hence, in most cases, frequent or excessive sighing means being under stress."

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Ruby +0 points · 7 months ago Sleep Commentator

Yawning is often a sign of lack of oxygen. Why that would be during the day, I don't know but is something to check out.

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · 7 months ago Sleep Commentator

I had never really considered sighing as a symptom until recently and neither had I related it directly to yawning but there are some obvious connections.

In very vague generalities it seems that when we are under stress (which is pretty much all the time in one way or another) some of us respond by suppressing our breathing and the effect is an altered oxygen carbon dioxide balance which sets off a distress signal that can be easily misread but it's this signal that often causes sighing or yawning.

I used to think of yawning and sighing as involuntary actions but it seems that on some level they actually are conscious choices which is why they are so susceptible to the power of suggestion or provocation.

Apparently the alarm can be switched off by resetting the oxygen/carbon dioxide levels and the fastest way to do that is to re-breathe into a paper bag for a few mins.

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Turquoiseturtle +0 points · 7 months ago

Yes, Lochnessie, I have OSA and basically never snore.

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jifjifjif +0 points · 7 months ago

I, too, an a tummy sleeper at some points during the night. I find that I am able to do so with a full face mask. I wear mine a bit tighter than I would like and when I tummy sleep, I put my arms under my pillow and rest my face close to one sedge of the pillow so my mask is protruding out from the side of the pillow and my ears and head are resting on the pillow. The mask stays on and I am able to sleep that way.

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