We've updated our privacy policy.

SleepDent

SleepDent
Joined May 2017
SleepDent
Joined May 2017

Actually, a visit to an ENT doctor might be in order in addition to the visit to your dentist. Poor nasal patency(poor breathing through the nose) can put a severe drag on an oral appliance and even cause it to fail. Since the ringing in the ears predated the oral appliance, that would also be a valid area of inquiry for an ENT. Since you are early on with the oral appliance, it is probably not adjusted to your sweet spot yet, so it wouldn't necessarily be working very well. You should certainly tell your dentist about your nasal problems and get his input on it. TMJ problems, in and of themselves, can cause ringing of the ears, and the oral appliance could conceivably have made it worse. The oral appliance could be causing two effects, one of which would make the ringing less severe and one that could make it worse. The condyle(ball joint) of your mandible sits very close to your inner ear. If your inner ear is already inflamed, pressure from the condyle on the inner ear as you brux could conceivably make the ringing worse. Often times your muscles do fight the oral appliance initially and bruxing can temporarily increase until the obstructive sleep apnea is under better control, at which time, the bruxing generally subsides. On the other hand, the mandibular protrusion caused by the appliance actually tends to pull the condyle further away from the inner ear, thus lessening the negative effects. It could go either way depending on what prevails. You have a lot to get sorted out here. a.b.luisi,d.m.d.