Introduce Yourself!

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dgingeri +0 points · 5 months ago

Hello, I'm Dan. I'm 46, and I have dealt with positional sleep apnea for 12 years by simply sleeping on my side. I live in the Denver area and am a systems administrator. I just recently decided to try to get a CPAP machine because of issues I'm begin having with my arms due to sleeping on my side, and that's why I'm here now.

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nianaguerrero +0 points · 4 months ago

I'm niana guerrero. I'm a new member of the forum myapnea , very pleased to be acquainted and make friends to share everything in life with people. Especially learned from the forum.

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dukeofthedeck +0 points · 4 months ago

Hi, I'm Marc. I'm new here also. I found out that I have sleep apnea about 6 weeks ago. Started CPAP about a month ago and still getting used to it and trying to reduce mask leakage.

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wiredgeorge +0 points · 4 months ago Sleep Enthusiast

If you are looking for mask leak advice, helps to know what pressure(s) you machine is set to and what type mask.

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dukeofthedeck +0 points · 4 months ago

I'm using a Resmed N20. The machine is set between 4 and 20. Leakage is usually in the mid 30's to mid 40's range.

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Motown +0 points · 4 months ago

Hi, my name is Mona. I have been on a CPAP now BiPap for over 15 years. I do not even nap without the machine. My original number of AHIs was 108. I also have a problem with stopping breathing during the day.

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HowardR3 +0 points · 4 months ago

Hi all, I'm Howard, found this site just today. I was diagnosed OSA about 10 years ago, then a couple years after was diagnosed with a a "slow-motion" traumatic brain injury or TBI (acquired hydrocephalus, from a bicycle crash almost 25 years ago) that was treated by installing a shunt to unblock flow of cerebral spinal fluid). Have since learned how incredibly important sleep is to brain health. I'm on my second CPAP machine (ResMed S9) and I think it's time for another. This one's about 5 years old and has been all over with me. But I can't get the chamber with the water to stay shut so I've been using it dry for some time. Sleep quality has been going downhill for last couple years, hard to know whether it's from an aging CPAP machine or if it's decline in brain function. But I'm going to try and get a new CPAP first, since getting a new brain isn't in the cards. ResMed doesn't make that model anymore so I wanted to ask folks if CPAP units "wear out" after a period of time like 5 years, and if anyone has had luck getting a replacement machine through social security disability. Lots to learn here, hoping enough of it sticks that I can learn something.

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sleeptech +0 points · 4 months ago Sleep Commentator

You should still be able to get a humidifier chamber for the S9 on eBay, or elsewhere online, which could save you a pile of money. I just had a look and there are a few places that sell them. Most CPAP machines are pretty reliable. I use Respironics, ResMed and Fisher & Paykel (the big 3 in CPAP) and they all have about the same life span of about 10 years give or take.

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wiredgeorge +0 points · 4 months ago Sleep Enthusiast

The S9 bearings tend to be a weak link. I have two of them that start the bearing scream after a bit of use. One day, I will get the gumption up to take one apart to fix the bearings as the S9 is a lot handier for travel than newer and larger machines.

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Shawn +0 points · 4 months ago

Hi my name is Shawn ,i have recently been diagnosed with severe sleep apnea as has my wife a couple of months ago .I am about to go to consultants this week and have it all explained to me and possibly have a machine set up prescribed to me too, i am 52 and have suffered for a very long time from irrational tiredness so it has become a way of life for me and up till now had blamed it on my Diabetes (type1) so i am on a new journey hopefully it will be a good one because i am done with bad health and sleep !.

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snuzyQ +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Commentator

Hi Shawn and welcome to the Forum. The Forum has been incredibly helpful to my husband and me. We were both diagnosed with severe sleep apnea within a month of each other in 2012. We are called "dualies" because we have been CPAPping together ever since. It is a journey, for sure, and we're wishing you all the best. Dial in with your needs. There're lots of folks here ready to help you along.

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snuzyQ +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Commentator

Hi my name is snuzyQ. Though I have been a member of the Forum since 2015, I am just now beginning to check in regularly. My husband and I were diagnosed with severe obstructive sleep apnea in the Fall of 2012 and have been CPAPping ever since. We can't imagine sleeping any other way now and are very pleased with the improvements that treatment has brought to our lives. It was scary at first, but posts such as the ones I now find on the Forum were instrumental in helping the two of us odopt CPAP as a way of life. My husband is quite occupied and will not be able to contribute at this time, but I'm turning my attentions back to the forum as a way of helping others and because it comforts me in all my health reverses. My apnea was discovered after it had already caused a lot of damage (I have multiple health issues). I would like to be among those who are championing sleep apnea with it's many variations to create more awareness. I think the more of we diagnosed as well as invested health providers who participate in our community, the more power we will mutually possess...for change...for healing...for all the good that sharing brings. So, that's why I'm back. See ya on the other side!

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Sierra +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Commentator

Just joined today. I have been involved in the CPAP stuff for about 3 years now, when my wife got diagnosed with OSA at an AHI of about 75. Had no insurance so we bought a ResMed S9 online to reduce the cost, and I became the setup and tech support guy. Now I have been also blessed with OSA too and have a AirSense 10 AutoSet. I like to use SleepyHead to track the treatment of both of us as we have no sleep doctor or sleep tech support. Short story - self taught, and I am slowly learning that there is nothing simple and obvious about apnea treatment. It is complex, and not an exact science. I think the secret is to keep an open mind, and remember that we are always learning.

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snuzyQ +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Commentator

Do you have any physician overseeing your care? Did a physician diagnose you and you wife with OSA? Have either of you had sleep studies done?

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Sierra +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Commentator

Yes, in theory I have a GP overseeing my care. I have diabetes (my wife as well), so we are seeing him every 3-6 months. My wife asked to have a sleep study done as she was having sleeping issues, and he prescribed one. It was a home study, and came back as severe apnea at about 67 AHI. I was a much more reluctant candidate as I could see what she was going through using a CPAP, and I really didn't want any part of it. I was getting good sleep, and really did not have sleep issues other than I was snoring, and that obviously was bugging my wife. I finally got coerced into completing a questionnaire, and I failed that, so I got the home sleep study prescribed as well. My AHI came back as lower but still severe at 33. The study lab which was the same one for both of us, send the results to the GP recommending a CPAP, and the GP just rubber stamps it.

The way the government health care system works in our area is that the sleep study, and a two week trial of a CPAP, is fully covered at no cost. However the CPAP is not. In both of our cases the sleep study clinic offered to sell us the machines at a cost of $2400 each. After some research I found I could buy them on line for about $900 using the prescription from the sleep clinic, signed by our doctor. So we each bought one, with mine this year, and my wife about 3 years ago. At that price you get limited follow up and monitoring. That is where the do it yourself part comes in. Our GP is of very limited help. I suspect he knows very little about apena other than what it basically is.

That said, I am not complaining. I know people who have insurance and take the deluxe $2400 deal, all paid for by insurance, and I think they get short changed. Their monitoring and followup is minimal to none. They just get an auto machine set with wide min max limits and the machine does its thing. And unless the results are really bad, nothing changes.

When we bought the machine for my wife, the lady we dealt with was good enough to tell us about SleepyHead, and we have used it ever since. I frankly don't know how anyone could effectively monitor and adjust their treatment without it. One the other hand I can also make you a bit obsessive. My one criticism of SleepyHead is that it seems overly harsh on the way it rates leaks. My machine always gives me a happy face, but SleepyHead almost always is very critical. I just ignore it!

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redwood +0 points · 3 months ago

Hello, I just joined today, I've had my Airsense 10 for about 2 1/2 weeks now and it has been a challenge for me. I've yet to use it for a whole night of sleep yet, but I've gotten closer. 6 hours in 6 of the last 9 days. I've been a smoker most of my life and I have some nasal congestion. I can handle it when I go to bed, but I need to turn during the night, multiple times because of hip issues. Of course I wake up at these times and often, one side of my nasal passages seems to be restricted. This bothers me a lot, as it seems I'm not getting enough air. I usually get up and try to get the passages clear again. This works to some degree. One thing, I have my humidifier maxed out and this seems to help. The only issue with that, is that it seems to use all the water, after about 6 hours. I've tried cutting back on the humidification, but it doesn't seem to work, as well. Any suggestions.

I'm curious as to how long it has taken others to fully adapt to their CPAP machines.

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Sierra +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Commentator

Yes, getting used to a CPAP is not always easy. I also use the AirSense 10 AutoSet. My wife adapted quickly, and me, not so quickly. I think a lot of it depends on how well the mask is suited to your personal requirements. Everyone is not the same, so there seems to be no silver bullet for a mask.

Some questions:

What make and model of a mask are you using? My experience has been that a nasal pillow type mask like the ResMed P10 can actually help keep the nasal passages clear. With it, if I go to bed clear, they usually stay clear all night.

Being short of air while going to sleep or during the night can be a CPAP setup issue of there not being enough pressure. Are you using the Ramp feature? What start pressure? What are your minimum and maximum pressures set at? Are you using EPR?

As for the humidifier I use the heated climate hose, and just set the Climate Control on Auto. Temperature is set at 27 C (80-81 F). If I sleep for 10 hours I pretty much use all the water. Using it all in 6 hours seems high, unless you are in a really dry climate. I would try using the auto setting to see how that goes.

Hope that helps some,

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redwood +0 points · 3 months ago

Thank you for the response.

I'm using the Resmed Mirage FX nasal mask. I'll need to get a new prescription to change it, I believe. I'm actually considering going to a full mask, because around 25% of nights, I must have my mouth open for a time.

I'm using autoramp and my pressure goes from 4 - 12. I'm not sure what EPR is?

I don't think that I have the heated hose.

I don't know if this is affecting things, but I was supposed to get a oxygen boost. Not much, but a little. Every step of the way towards getting my CPAP machine through Medicare has been littered with issues. The latest was the omission of oxygen due to the supplier taking too long to get all the correct paperwork done. It took me over 7 mos. since my first sleep study that diagnosed me with sleep apnea until I received my CPAP machine. I had 3 sleep studies done and now I need another to get the oxygen. It has been a trying experience dealing with everything.

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Sierra +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Commentator

That is the same mask as my wife uses. Opening your mouth can be a problem. It may account for your higher use of humidifier water. I use a Breathwear Halo chin strap to reduce the open mouth time.

If you look on the end of the hose it will say Climate Air Line on the grey fitting if it is a heated hose. Unless you have a heated hose, you will not be able to select the auto climate control feature.

A pressure setting of 4-12 is quite a wide range. I find that 4 cm is quite a low pressure and it can feel like you are starving for air. Assuming you need 12 cm maximum, a more normal range would be 9 cm minimum to 12 cm. The start pressure for the Autoramp should be about 7 cm.

If you want some help with how to make these setting changes, it is probably best to start a new thread.

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wiredgeorge +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Enthusiast

My experience probably has nothing to do with your situation but I have a hard time breathing through my nose during the day. It has been broken a number of times and I suspect that might have something to do with it. When I turn my machine on, that issue goes away and it makes sleeping a pretty nice experience since I can breathe easily through my nose. I tried a nasal mask but my pressure was TOOOOO high for the mask as the exhaust holes were not big enough. It collected condensation and the mask was unbearable. I now use an Amara View which allows me to sleep on my side or back without issue. It fits up under my nose but has the exhaust holes that are of adequate size to avoid the feeling that I can't exhale. Dry nose/mouth is an issue that may not be cleaned up through higher humidity or changes in humidity level as it is usually from mouth breathing. I use an athletic "boil & bite" mouth guard to keep my jaw from going slack when it is relaxed and my mouth opening as a result.

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Chrisbgood46 +0 points · 3 months ago

Hi my name is chris and i have sleep apena. Thank god for this machine. I was a premature baby and didnt get proper oxygen and had this all my life. I cant say enough of the rough journey its been as doctors new there was something with me but what. How ive even survived and over 300 apena per night. At the time i was going through this i was the second case in canada had this problem but no help for me. Dr.kreger tried his best but and doctors in Toronto they all missed the signs i had or were out of the norm.
So it wasnt till i was 40 years old they discovered it was sleep apena and felt born again. Its been amazing how many people have this problem some it changes there life and some not. There are times i feel i love the opptunity to be on a show to tell this story so others learn from it and how doctors new nothing of this sleep problem. Im fortunate i had good family and doctor support cause there isnt any help out there when doctors dont no the answer. Im so glad to see a site up and running like this because i was totally alone through this process. One thing i can tell you never give up on hope no matter what. Ive spent my life fighting this where i can honestly say i did lose hope. Between the doctors and god this machine was the last thing i ever dreamed would work. Who ever invented this machine thank you. What im saying here is only a part of what ive been through and thankful they have gotten this far to help others.

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Sierra +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Commentator

Chris, that is a very inspirational post. Welcome to the site.

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Cybergranny +0 points · 3 months ago

Hi all, I have just been diagnosed with severe sleep apnea. I am scheduled to return to the sleep lab for a nights trial with a cpap machine. This diagnosis was as surprise to me. I am anxious about the cpap as my husband tried one many years ago and it was a horrible failure. A dental appliance is less scary to me as I have been wearing a night bruxism device for years with no problems. I am glad that I found this group.

I guess my biggest worry is that I like to curl up on my husbands chest at night and can't imagine doing that with hoses and masks.

I welcome any suggestions!

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Sierra +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Commentator

Welcome to the club... Some suggestions:

If you have any choice in the matter, I would recommend the ResMed AirSense 10 AutoSet For Her machine. In my opinion, that is the best APAP available, and they are all priced pretty much the same. Getting a mask that works and you can live with is often the hardest part. The ResMed AirFit P10 mask is probably a good first one to try. It comes with a very light and flexible hose extension that gives quite a bit without dislodging the mask from your nose. If there is any opportunity to try different masks during the evaluation period, I would take advantage of that. As for the dental appliance option, it is typically not used when you are in the severe apnea category, but you could ask your dentist or doctor about it. Dentist fitted ones, can be more expensive than a CPAP though. And with a dental device you are kind of flying blind. With a machine you get a sleep study done every night, and it updates you on how well you are doing.

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Cybergranny +0 points · 3 months ago

Thank you! I didn't know that there were masks for women!

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Sierra +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Commentator

The AirSense 10 Auto For Her is actually the APAP machine. It has an option to run in the For Her mode. It responds to apnea events in a way that is said to be more suitable for women. But, it can also be run in the standard mode. I think it makes sense even for men to get the For Her version of the APAP. It is just another available option, with no downside. Same price.

There are masks for women as well, although that may be more cosmetic (colour) than different. Some masks may have a smaller headgear, and come with different cushion inserts if they are intended for women. If you go for the AirFit P10 I would also suggest the For Her version. The headstraps on these things tend to stretch. I know the colour is different, but it would be good if the headstraps are a little smaller too.

Try to avoid getting a fixed pressure version of the machine such as the CPAP or Elite version. There is little difference in cost between them and the full AutoSet version. Some info on the AutoSet For Her version at the link below:

AutoSet For Her

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snuzyQ +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Commentator

Hi Cybergranny and welcome.

You'll still be able to curl up on your husbands chest at night - especially if you go with a nasal pillows mask. I use the ResMed Swift FX for Her (and have been using it for 6 years now). I dab a little AYR nasal saline gel into each nostril before bedtime to help with the air seal and to provide comfort plus protection against sores. I gather my hair up over the backstrap of my mask to help anchor my mask in place at night. Even if you are a life-long mouth breather, as I was, you can still use the nasal pillows masks. There is a simple brain retrain technique you can use to end your mouth breathing forever. We'll help you.

A SnuggleHose is a plush hose covering that you can purchase online. It comes in different colors. I have a pink one that matches my mask and like to think of it as an extra "teddy bear" in bed with me.. When you sleep, just remember to turn your exhaust away from your husband's face. You won't have to turn your face away from him. You'll still be able to cuddle. He'll appreciate that. He'll like the feel of the SnuggleHose against his chest.

CPAP is the most effective and, actually the least invasive of all the treatments offered for obstructive sleep apnea. It is the gold standard of treatment for OSA. Some people adapt to CPAP from the first night, but for most of us, there is an adjustment period of anywhere from a few days up to 6 months. Patience and persistence shortens the adjustment time. This is, after all, a whole new way of sleeping. Our brains do not like change. They crave whatever is the accustomed norm. Our job, as CPAPpers, is to provide repeated stimulus to convince our brains that this is the new normal. It's as simple as masking up each night and turning on our machines and relaxing into sleep...over and over again. I did my adjustment all at once and just kept my machine and mask on all night from the get go. I loved not having to get up and use the restroom at night anymore. I had been rising 6 times per night before I got my CPAP. My adjustment period was about 3 weeks. I'm a granny, too, by the way. You can do this. Everything is going to be even better than OK.

CPAP treatment has really changed for the better over the years. Machines are much quieter, masks are much better and more comfortable and there are many more comfort measures available to you than there were years ago - even just 6 years ago, when I began using CPAP. My husband was given a ResMed AirSense 10 AutoSet . He loves it. This machine is whisper quiet. If you snore, you will no longer snore audibly with your CPAP treatment and your husband will like that too. I also wear a night time dental appliance for TMJ syndrome as you do for your bruxism. This has improved my apnea (down to 25 apneas per hour on average), but that is still not acceptable for someone who wants to avoid the many serious, chronic health conditions that go along with untreated sleep apnea.

I was scared at first, too, but I made up my mind from the get go that I couldn't afford to fail at CPAP. There are just too many ill effects on our health when we are not treated for our OSA or are inadequately treated. My husband discovered, in the newfound quiet of our bedroom, that his own snoring was waking him up. He gathered the courage to get a sleep test done and sure enough, his sleep apnea was far worse than mine. His oxygen desaturations were down to 80% each time he had an apnea and his heart was racing to 175 beats per minute. We are "duelies" in CPAPdom.

You're going to be just fine. Keep on checking in.

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TuzaHu973 +0 points · 3 months ago

I wrote a posting last week. I just signed in to see if there were any updates and I can't find my posting. I thought I put it in this forum. sure would appreciate some assistance, new to CPAP last week. How do I find my posting to check for replies? thanks.

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Sierra +0 points · 3 months ago Sleep Commentator

You posted in a thread titled "BiPAP Machine Functionality". You have a couple of responses to it. Here is a link to your post

https://myapnea.org/forum/bipap-machine-functionality/1#comment-17300

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05Moose +0 points · 3 months ago

I'm Jim and joined because I'm just getting started with a CPAP machine and had a question where I couldn't find a good answer searching online. I'm also a forum admin on a vehicle forum, so I'm quite familiar with forums. Hoping someone here has some advice.

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snuzyQ +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Commentator

Hi Jim...there is lots of good advice here on the forum and especially for newbies. We've all been there at some point. Fire away with your questions...we're here for you.

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Frontkick75 +0 points · 2 months ago

Hello all! I’m 43, just got a Resmed Airsense 10 that I’m using with a Fishel & Paykal Simplus FFM last Wednesday and I started using it Thursday night. Things are going pretty good but I keep getting leaks and high pressure even on ramp setting. So frustrated! 🤔

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wiredgeorge +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Enthusiast

Welcome... the ramp feature is intended to ramp up pressure rather than deliver full pressure from start up. The intent is to make getting to sleep more comfortable. The ramp time can be adjusted to spread out the ramp so that pressure starts lower and then increases over a longer period to where it gets to max and hopefully you are asleep.

The Simplus mask be a leaker. Finding the right size cushion is critical but I used that mask a few years ago and still got some leaks where air hit my eyes. It didn't affect therapy but was annoying. The mask can also make rude noises if it is bumped and loses seal for a second. To fix this, I used mask pads; pieces of tee-shirt like material cut in the shape of the cushion. No more air in the eyes or rude noises. A few leaks do not affect therapy but can be irritating. Go to amazon.com and check for mask pads. I eventually went with an Amara View mask and it doesn't need pads nor does it leak much. Much better design for me but your experience may be different.

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Sierra +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Commentator

What are the max and min pressures that the machine is set at? When you first turn it on to use it, it flashes up a status screen and the min-max pressures are displayed. Leaks tend to be worse with higher pressures, but if you need the pressure for treatment, then you need it.

On the Ramp feature I like to set mine to Auto. This feature actually holds the pressure at a fixed level until the machine decides you are asleep. Then it ramps up quite quickly to your minimum pressure. I also like to use EPR when it is in the ramp mode, but then have it turn off when the ramp is over. If you want to know how to do that, post again and I will take you through it.

As far as mask leaks I have not had good success with the full face versions I have tried. About all I can say is keep trying to adjust the straps to get the right level of tightness. Start with them quite loose and work your way up until the leaks just stop. Leaks near the top of the mask, then adjust the top straps. Leaks near bottom, adjust the bottom straps. This is best done lying on your back in bed. If you Put your mask on, turn the machine on, and then use the Settings menu to run the Mask Test. It will take the pressure up to your maximum pressure set value. Leave it like that until you get the mask fitting well. Then there is an option to stop the mask test. Good luck!

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purplefan100 +0 points · 2 months ago

hi im new on the site. and new to sleep apnea. i have an appointment to get a machine this week and i have no idea what im doing. or what to ask or get

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snuzyQ +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Commentator

Welcome to the forum, purplefan100. The machine that you get will be determined by the type of sleep apnea that you have. They all seem to be very fine machines. You can relax and just go with the flow on this one.. Don't worry about not knowing anything. You will learn as you go and there are a lot of folks here on the forum that will respond to your questions and calls for help. Just post what you need on the forum and help is on the way.

Your biggest decision is going to be about the mask. Did you like the mask that was given to you for your titration? The titration is the time period that is used (usually overnight, at least) to determine what your prescribed pressures should be. Anyway, if you liked the mask that you used, then why not go with it? My husband and I used this strategy and found out, within the first 2 months of CPAP, that we didn't really like those first masks for a bunch of reasons. Fortunately for us, a few of those reasons were medical in nature and our health plan allowed us to change to different masks at no cost. Most health insurance plans cover this. We chose the Resmed Swift FX nasal pillows and have used these ever since. They are minimally invasive, comfortable and there was much less leakage. But, then again, your choice of masks might be limited by your prescribed treatment pressures. Let your sleep tech guide you with this. There are no mistakes here...just a learning curve. Most of we CPAP long-timers are still on the learning curve. You will find what works for you.

You're in good company. Relax and enjoy the ride.

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purplefan100 +0 points · 2 months ago

i got a mask to try. i wasnt sure what to try. i got a full face one. it is comfortable. but where the mask touches my face iget hot and start to feel like im sweating there. i had the dream wear full face.

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snuzyQ +0 points · about 2 months ago Sleep Commentator

It often takes several tries to pick out a mask that seems "right". Keep trying and making adjustments or changes as needed.

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Bassguy62 +0 points · 2 months ago

Hello all, I am Steve and new to the forum and Sleep Apnea. I am getting my CPAP machine tomorrow and hoping to start feeling better once I am able to get used to using it. Was surprised at how many friends use on and almost all said getting used to wearing the mask, which I am pretty I will need. After that very few had nothing but good things to say and feel much better. For me the common tiredness in the day and I also get occasionally bouts of AFIB which my cardiologists and sleep doctor both say can be caused by the sleep apnea. On my sleep study I stopped breathing 58 times an hour and my oxygen level dropped to 78%. I can't remember looking forward to anything medical but this one I am as I hope to feel like I used too. So tired all the time and my blood pressure has been worse as well. Nothing crazy but not my normals and recently a follow up echo and stress test and like the others before, all was fine so maybe thinking the both may be related to this or at think it's not helping any. I know they said they have several masks to try when I get the machine. I think the machine will be what my insurance and or Medical store and doctor recommends. I was going to ask what mask too choose but I am sure we are all so different that it's going to be trial an error till I find what works well for me. Have a great Sunday afternoon and wish me luck !!, Thanks, Steve

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wiredgeorge +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Enthusiast

Steve, sounds like you are getting things on track. First thing you need to do is get a copy of your sleep study so as time goes on, you will see what the numbers and terms are that relate to you. There is so much new apnea jargon used, it won't make sense a lot but you would do well to steer your own therapy. Your DME (durable medical equipment) provider will give you one of several brands of machine that fit your prescription. Some folks get a straight CPAP but there is APAP, BIPAP and several other paps whose name stems from the manufacturers proprietary lingo.

You are right about the mask. There is no way to tell for sure which mask type you will eventually settle on as it is a crap shoot. I think the DME hands you whatever mask they have on the shelf but that may not be the case for everyone. The cushion size is critical and you can't be sure till you have the mask on at night and have the machine pumping. Anyway, best of luck and do get a copy of your study and prescription and try and figure out what all that is about... it will help you in the long run.

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Bassguy62 +0 points · 2 months ago

Well I got my machine and went with the Amara View full face mask as it felt comfortable and a small size since I am claustrophobic. First night all was going well and about 5 1/2 hours in I woke up with my heart racing and ended up just getting up. I do get panic attacks and maybe when I woke up and notice the mask I kinda freaked out, not sure. That said for the 5 1/2 hours I wore it I only had point 4 events which is way down from my 58 events per hour before the CPAP. Now last night I put it on and for some reason I was being fed way to much oxygen and tried for about a half hour for it too level off but never did. The ramp is set on auto and the first night it did this but for only about a minute and seemed to adjust to just what I needed. The mask is tricky to get on the same position with your nose setting on top but not sure what caused it. Took it off and will stop by and see my therapist today. Very discouraging but I imagine not all that uncommon as you get used to the machine. Will see what she says and may try the other mask that I had narrowed down as my 2 favorites. Not as minimal but goes over my nose and seems easier to get a consistent fit night after night. I do have a copy of my sleep report but just really look at the bottom line results and not all the other info yet. I will keep you posted and feel free to post any advice you may have. Thanks, Steve

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Sierra +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Commentator

What make and model of machine do you have? Sometimes the ramp start pressure is set too low, and the minimum pressure can also be set too low. That can cause a starving for air feeling.

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Bassguy62 +0 points · 2 months ago

I have a Airsense 10. I wasn't starving for air but just the opposite, getting far too much. I talked the resp therapist and she said I may have had a bad leak so it tried to compensate. So checked everything last night before I went to bed and did much better. Got a little over 6 hours in and only had .1 events. Still have the ramp set on auto so can always change that if needed but I think is was leaking where the hose connects to my face mask.

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Sierra +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Commentator

If you have a AHI of only 0.1 your pressure may be set too high. I find when I have leaks the machine will put out more air to compensate, but not necessarily more pressure. It would be helpful to know your pressure settings. When the machine first turns on, you will see a number in the middle of a circle on the display. That will ramp up and settle out at your ramp start pressure within about 10 seconds or so. Near to the top right of the screen will be your minimum and maximum pressures.

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Bassguy62 +0 points · 2 months ago

That night I did only have .1 events. The other 2 nights, one was .5 and the other .6 , the .6 was last night with a different mask. My settings are 8-20. It usually is about 8-9 after it settles in after the first 30-60 seconds. The issues I had with too much air sure seem because of a bad leak as with the new mask I tried last night, while adjusting it to get a good seal the same happened until I got it sealed correctly then it was fine. I think being so new the first time that happened caught me off guard and now I know what to expect. Finding the right mask is being a little tricky. I really like the Amara View but after just 2 nights I started to get a pretty sore nose as this one fits under you nose, which helps it be so small, but I don't think it will work for me. Last night I tried a Airfit F20 which sets more on the bridge of my nose and didn't get the irritation I was from the Amara View. I think I may have had a little too tight, but I am learning it's a bit of trial and error. Only made it 4 1/2 hours. I got up to take a drink of water and couldn't get back to sleep with it on so I set it aside, where with the Amara View I made it 5 hours and 6 hours, but then the sore nose started. The CPAP sure does work though. My AHI on my sleep study was 58.1 (total) I think 13 of them were Hypopnea if memory serves. Still learning all the different terms on reading the test. Thanks for the feedback. I am sure I will get there but finding the right mask is being tricky.

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Nightmare +0 points · 2 months ago

I am Doug, 69 y.o., diagnosed and prescribed a CPAP about two months ago. My initial PSG AHI ~6. At my 30 day follow up AHI 15. Cardiologist sleep doctor right away volunteered Central SA and prescribed a titration PSG in a couple of weeks and an ASV to follow.

I am very pleased as I thought it would take a year of wrangling to get the CSA diagnosis. I hope that this is check off towards Athletic Heart Syndrome. On the way I have been through a diagnosis of Neuro-Cardiogenic Hypotension that cost an amazing amount of money. The ultimate prescription was a Beta-blocker that left me trying to do chores at 45 BPM. I AMA’d off the Beta-blocker.

At my initial cardiologist’s consultation he, jokingly, prescribed “More salt, more liquids, and put on 20 pounds.” So I took that to mean more potato chips, more beer and I put on 20 pounds. That was eight years ago, and I’ve been fine on the low blood pressure front - no fainting. A recent suggestion of PVC’s that I had taken to be AFib for my thought that I could auto-convert with Valsalva maneuver. (Ah, career submariner including civilian career in nuclear power.)

My complaint that led to seeking a sleep apnea diagnosis was waking during panic attacks; diaphoresis, tachycardia, anxiety. If I had known that nocturea was a symptom I would have been here years ago! Now I am sleeping 7 hours soundly and waking gently.

I’m 6’2” 235# 45 BPM resting, ~100 miles per week vigorous maximum 140 BPM bicycling (recumbent tricycle). Lifetime mountaineer, skier, Olympic grade swimmer, and now cycling in my seniority. Trained EMT in the Eighties.

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snuzyQ +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Commentator

Hi Doug and welcome to the forum. It seems like you have things well in hand. Keep checking in and let us know how things are coming along.

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texasplumr +0 points · 2 months ago

Hi, I’m a 64 year old male and live in Austin, Texas. Recently diagnosed and having problems. And of course, the best place for this is usually a forum. So here I am. Hope to learn a lot!

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snuzyQ +0 points · 2 months ago Sleep Commentator

Welcome to the forum, texasplumr. We've all been there at some point. Lots of support here.

Best wishes to you in your sleep apnea journey.

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Turquoiseturtle +0 points · 2 months ago

If you are an athlete/cyclist and having heart issues, read "The Haywire Heart." So many of my very fit cycling buddies are having AFIB and other heart problems. One of our ride leaders feels so strongly about this, he makes a pitch for this book on every ride he leads.

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sleepydiane +1 point · about 2 months ago

Just got diagnosed and am sleeping without insomnia for the first time in my whole life. Thinking back to childhood when I could not sleep and could not keep up in school (ADD and dyslexia), I think I must have had sleep apnea my whole life. Has anyone else experienced this?

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Cpapian +0 points · about 2 months ago

Hello Sleepydiane, in Dr. Steven Parks book "Sleep Interrupted" he discusses the possibility of children with OSA being diagnosed as ADHD.

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