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obbyone +0 points · 17 days ago

I am a 43 years old male. I was diagnosed with OSA 3 years ago. Used a CPAP for 2 years, but somehow it became CSA since it damaged my brain due to the high pressureof the machine. I am now on BiPAP and having my AHI < 5. My blood pressure is now normal, sugar levels and my brain memory issues.

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Sierra +0 points · 17 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

It is not uncommon for someone diagnosed with OSA to develop CSA on treatment. Normally it resolves itself in a few weeks. It did not for me. I think one of the issues is that in auto mode a CPAP can use too much pressure. I have improved my AHI by going to fixed pressure CPAP and by limiting the pressure.

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · 17 days ago Sleep Commentator

Hi obbyone, Welcome to the forum. Where were you diagnosed and who initiated your treatment?

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eupillsinfo +0 points · 15 days ago

Hello everyone, I am a pharmacist, want to join discussions related to online medicine.

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Sierra +0 points · 15 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

I have a question for you. What are the common prescription and over the counter drugs that could cause or aggravate central apnea?

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Biguglygremlin +0 points · 15 days ago Sleep Commentator

Hi eupillinfo,

Welcome to the forum. What kind of discussions did you have in mind?

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phil +0 points · 14 days ago

Hi I was diagnosed with moderate sleep apnea.. Im getting my cpap today but honestly I freaking out a little.. Mask and air make me panicky.. Hopefully I can overcome the anxiety part..anyone else have this issue?

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Sierra +0 points · 14 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

Welcome to the forum. I certainly was anxious and suffered for it when I started using the CPAP. I suspect it is fairly normal. That said, there are a few things that may help some. The default minimum pressure on these things is 4 cm. That is quite low, and can be uncomfortable for going to sleep. If you have not picked up the machine yet, I would ask them to set up the minimum to about 7 cm if they are agreeable given your degree of apnea. The other thing to do is try using the machine and mask while watching TV. This will give you some time to get used to it, rather than trying it for the first time at bedtime. Hope that helps some.

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MountainGoat +0 points · 11 days ago

Hi All,

I started another thread about what experiences people's had with objective medical tests like blood tests to show an improvement possibly due to CPAP, but as a further introduction, reposting my intro from that post here.

I was referred for a sleep study as I suffer from type 2 diabetes, hypothyroidism, hypertension, obesity (31 BMI), polycythaemia and elevated haematocrit, high triglycerides and low HDL cholesterol as well as low testosterone. The doctor who referred me felt that the only way all of these can come together is due to OSA and that treating this will resolve a lot of these issues.

During the sleep study done in May 2017, I was diagnosed with severe obstructive sleep apnea, AHI 31.5. Due to the quality of the sleep study, which by the looks of it from other's comments here are pretty standard, I wasn't convinced that CPAP was really indicated. My reason for this was that the study found only 2.9 events per hour of obstructive apnea when on my back (NREM) and zero for other positions, including during REM sleep, for an average of 1.1 NREM and 0 REM. The hypopnea events though was a lot higher at 31.9 NREM and 26.7 REM. The thing is, I don't sleep on my back and the NREM OA events of 2.9/hr was actually while I was awake, waiting for day to break.

After subsequent visits to an ENT and a pulmonologist, both recommending CPAP, I decided to take the plunge. Interestingly enough, and admittedly after only three nights of use, the machine reflects similar findings to the sleep study with an average of 0.43 obstructive and 0.73 hypopnea events. However, the clear airway events are 4.57 average, pushing the AHI up to 5.73. The sleep study didn't recognise any of the hypopnea events as central apnea but again understand that often happens with sleep studies.

I started using a ResMed AirSense 10 Autoset with N30i nasal mask three nights ago, but have done a lot of reading on machines, masks, OSA etc. before the time and found this forum to be a fantastic resource. We're currently still fine tuning the settings on the machine, so hopefully the central apnea events can be reduced while maintaining the obstructive and hypopnea events at a low level.

What makes life more complicated for me is that I work at an altitude of 2,200 meter (~7,200 foot) above sea level for up to 16 days at a time, with a break of 7 to 10 days at sea level. This also has an effect on my polycythaemia and elevated haematocrit, as the wonderfully adaptable body adjust for the lower level of oxygen by creating more red blood cells.

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Sierra +0 points · 11 days ago Sleep Enthusiast

With all those extra red blood cells have you considered taking up marathon running or long distance biking? Seems to me that those guys do all sorts of devious things to get their blood cell count up. You could do it legally!

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sleeptech +0 points · about 17 hours ago Sleep Enthusiast

"I don't sleep on my back and the NREM OA events of 2.9/hr was actually while I was awake, waiting for day to break."

I know you may have felt like you were awake, you might even swear it on all that is sacred, but I would practically guarantee that you slept a little at least. For any respiratory events to be scored on a study, be they apnoeas, hypopnoeas or any others, your brain must be in sleep for at least 10 seconds, as identified by an EEG. In simple terms, the human brain pretty much sucks at monitoring its own sleep. It's not what it was built for.

Adjusting your machine for altitude is usually fairly simple, depending on the individual machine.

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