Forum · Using humidifier but still getting dry throat/mouth

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[-] SleepyMommy703 +0 points · 14 days ago

I have recently returned to using my CPAP, and I probably will be back with many more questions, but this one has me baffled right now so hopefully someone can help. I had a Resmed S9 and it was having issues including the humidifier not seeming to work. So I got a brand new machine the other day (the 10) and it's definitely using the water because the water chamber is almost empty in the morning but my throat and mouth are super dry several times a night. I have a nasal mask, but I also use a chin strap to keep my mouth closed. I really don't think my mouth is actually opening because in the past that would always wake me up and my lips aren't drying out at all.

What seems to be happening is that while my lips are staying closed my jaw is still dropping enough for the air to flow from my nose through my mouth without actually leaking. My chin strap already has to be rather uncomfortably tight to be very effective, any tighter and I doubt I could tolerate it.

At first I thought I should bump up the humidifier but last night I changed it from 5 to 6 and I woke up with a tube full of noisy water droplets.

Any thoughts on what I can do to prevent this from happening?

Thanks! Heather

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[-] pattyloof +0 points · 14 days ago

I need a lot of humidity too, and one thing which helped with the water issue is to increase the temperature in your tube (if you have heated tubing). If your room is very cool, without the heating you'll start getting condensation inside the tube. Try increasing the temperature one degree at a time and see if that helps.

Patty

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[-] SleepyMommy703 +0 points · 14 days ago

I don't have heated tubing, but maybe I should look into it when I get my next set of supplies. I skipped it the first time they asked because honestly I don't like the idea of warm air coming at me. I tend to always be rather hot so I thought that would just make it worse. But if it helps me get enough moisture without causing the tube to fill with water I guess it's worth a try.

Thanks!

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[-] pattyloof +0 points · 13 days ago

It doesn't have to be hot, but the tubing can be set at the temperature you want. It's a nice way to control the humidity in the tubing.

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[-] Sizewell +0 points · 14 days ago

I used to wake up with very dry mouth, but then I was given a heated tube to go with my Resmed 10 and it certainly has helped quite a bit. I also used a nasal mask. My mouth is sometimes a little dry but nowhere near as bad as what it used to be. I have both the humidifier and heated tube on auto setting and I have not noticed any difference between not having the heated tube and having the heated tube in regards to hot air. I was also given a chin strap which certainly reduced quite significantly the leaks registered on the machine that I was having with sleeping with my mouth open.

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[-] wiredgeorge +0 points · 12 days ago Sleep Commentator

My experience has been that dry mouth and a lot of water being used points to your mouth opening a bit and air escaping that way. There are numerous ways that folks have found to keep this from happening; as has been pointed out, the strap, tape (ouch) and I use a mouth guard. All these mitigate mask leak which is really mouth leak. My pressure is set 21/25 and I have the humidity on 2 and a tank lasts 3-4 days (UNLESS I HAVE MOUTH LEAKS) and these will use the water in a single night.

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[-] InventiveRedNewt9242 +0 points · 11 days ago

My therapist recommended to increase the humidity level. If that doesn't work, consider additional humidifier next to your bedside.

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