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Biguglygremlin

Biguglygremlin
Joined Nov 2018
Bio

Male aged 60+

Overweight

Very Severe Apnea

CPAP user since June 2014

Resmed 9

Pressure <12>

Nasal Pillows

Philips Nuance

RLS PLMD PTSD CFS RBD

Australia

Biguglygremlin
Joined Nov 2018
Bio

Male aged 60+

Overweight

Very Severe Apnea

CPAP user since June 2014

Resmed 9

Pressure <12>

Nasal Pillows

Philips Nuance

RLS PLMD PTSD CFS RBD

Australia

I'm at a considerable disadvantage when it comes to watching current events because, as much as I do love charts and graphs and statistics, I love them BECAUSE they are so adaptable and dishonest and so much fun to play with.

Our criteria for testing is much the same as most countries. We are only supposed to be testing those who are really sick, with the full range of symptoms and even then only if they are already in hospital. Any other tests were initially used on incoming travellers to place the blame on other countries and on medical workers to protect them and to prevent spread in vital areas.

If someone is ill at home with all the COVID19 symptoms they are not tested and they are discouraged from presenting at the hospitals. In UK for quite some time those who died at home, even if it was from the virus, were not counted. Similar methods might well apply to other countries.

Then there is the fact that even those tests that are done and show as negative are generally somewhere from 40% to 80% inaccurate and presumably that would also impact on the supposed cause of death.

I guess my point is that as with all things human, especially when politics becomes involved, everybody has an agenda which distorts the data so we can never know what is really happening at any given time.

I waited and watched to see if the other side of the equation would be released, the demographics for all the negative results, because it would tell us where the major omissions were and give some credence to the the positive data, but in the few instances where my wife stumbled across data, and sent me the link, it was redacted before I could even open it.

I suppose in retrospect that, once the virus is loose in the general population, the only number that really matters is the number of deaths, but only in comparison to the total number of deaths from all causes compared to the average number of deaths for the same period in previous years.

A simple example of this method is that apparently in New York the number of persons dying at home has increased from 20 to 200 per day and presumably the majority of those extra 180 deaths are COVID19 related although they are probably not being counted as such.

I suspect that many older people who don't get out much will have to deal with this virus without getting diagnosed.

Not that it's a good idea to avoid diagnosis but many of our governments, for reasons mostly to do with politics and economics, are not making testing available to the majority of their citizens no matter what symptoms they might have.

So I figure that it will be treated by many of us like most other infections that we deal with at home, unless it becomes life threatening, at which point medics, doctors and hospitals will need to be involved and, if it is serious enough, they will run diagnostic tests for their own safety.

I can see the point you are making about avoiding hospitals Sierra, and agree with it in pretty much all circumstances including this virus, while ever it is safe and sustainable, but I doubt that a GP would have any leverage with the hospital system and I don't think any hospital in Australia would offer credible assurances in advance because many of their decisions are made and unmade on the spur of the moment, so it would all come down to changing cirumstances, availability and priority.

I guess that is a good argument for effective preparation and communication.

Perhaps preparing a brief medical history clearly noting relevant details and medications as well as the severity of Apnea and the machine settings.

Letting those we share our lives with know about the medical history and showing them how to pack and prep the CPAP in case it is possible to use it later.

One of the greatest risks is that the patient might be too sick to do what needs doing and perhaps even too sick or confused to communicate effectively.

Hopefully none of these considerations will be needed but, according to the concepts espoused by Murphy, being unprepared is not a good option.