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Biguglygremlin

Biguglygremlin
Joined Nov 2018
Bio

Male aged 60+

Overweight

Very Severe Apnea

CPAP user since June 2014

Resmed 9

Pressure <12>

Nasal Pillows

Philips Nuance

RLS PLMD PTSD CFS RBD

Australia

Biguglygremlin
Joined Nov 2018
Bio

Male aged 60+

Overweight

Very Severe Apnea

CPAP user since June 2014

Resmed 9

Pressure <12>

Nasal Pillows

Philips Nuance

RLS PLMD PTSD CFS RBD

Australia

Yesterday, when I was young ........

We used to have a flock of sheep and despite the respect they enjoy in some books they are pretty stupid creatures. If we were driving them along a fence and they spotted something on that fence, like a jacket carelessly flung there in the heat of the afternoon, each sheep would baulk, then do a funny leap and run past it. The overall effect was a pile-up much as you see on every highway when a car has pulled over, way off the road, and caused a 5km traffic jam.

My point is that, as much as I hate to admit it, we are not particularly smart either individually or collectively and we baulk and react much like those sheep.

The other aspect that I notice, even amongst all the smoke and mirrors of current politics and the resulting media frenzy, is the profound power of a single word or concept.

In the past we have seen the power of words like communist or terrorist or terms like illegal immigrants and people smugglers then we discovered concepts like greenies and climate change and many others. Now we get to add words like panic buying, hoarding, pandemic and lockdown.

Ok I've lost the plot again but I think what I'm getting at is that those words are used like the jacket on the fence. They focus our attention. They provoke a reaction. All of which is essentially good right?

But they are also used to distract us so that we don't see the cause and effect, or the many other options, or what is happening elsewhere. And, of course, they work brilliantly.

The power of a word is incredible.

So our commercial world runs on just enough margin between supply and demand to ensure that most shelves are stocked most of the time. The pattern changes and demand gets a bit stronger, The supply chain is slow to respond and the public become aware of the shortfalls and the media pick up on the issue and slap some labels on it. PANIC-BUYING! HOARDING! Demand becomes even stronger and the entire manufacture, import, retail supply chain begins to fail.

That puts us all in the position that Sierra describes above where, in the middle of a pandemic, instead of going out to the shops fortnightly or perhaps once a week to grab the meds, fruit and veg, meat and groceries in one trip, we find ourselves coming home without many of the essential items we went out for, and having to go out again earlier or later or on a different day, and no longer able to select our preferred brand or size but just grab whatever is still available, effectively adding to the supply problem for everybody else and increasing the risk of infection for ourselves and the greater community.

I suspect that the best protection from a problem of this magnitude in the future, is somehow connected to encouraging independent media, global education and compulsory voting. Which is tantamount to wishing for world peace.

Oh how I do love 'experts' and statistics, although what I was able to find at the above site, was more like a disclaimer, with no rationale provided.

I wracked my poor brain for a while to find a situation in which that potential might apply, and once I got past the point that Sierra makes, which is essentially that the only viable alternative was to simply stop breathing, and my own view that most of us 'oldies' are more likely to be the destination than the source, it occurred to me that if we transplant the scene into a hospital ward then the CPAP machine might become problematic, depending on what containment systems are in place, and certainly there would be issues to do with cleaning and maintenance.

I really can't see how it would increase the risk at home. In fact a full face mask or chin strap would serve to suppress any droplets from coughing. Not that that would make any difference because anybody else sharing the same space will be infected anyway.

I had wondered about the oxygen. It might be interesting to know more about although I really hope things don't get to that stage.

I didn't intend this thread to become apocalyptic.

I am not personally stressed or anxious about this virus, although obviously new rules and concepts do apply. For me it is interesting and challenging. Yet another puzzle to be solved.

I intended this thread to be about being prepared and if SleepDent's observations reflect the views of the medical staff at large then it is something we do need to be aware of.